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Thread: ND filters

  1. #1
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    Question ND filters

    As a part of my new years resolution to become a better photographer I went to photography shop and purchased a Neutral Density filter. My hopes are that this will improve photographs that are taken in low light and cloudly contions. The only filter I purchased was a +2. I plan to add the the rest of the filter values once I learned to use this filter better. What other light conditions are approriate to use the ND filter and what F-stop and shutter speeds should be used in suck instances? Also I learned recently that I can screw one filter on top of another yet I don't hear much about this what other filter should I use with the ND filter, I was thinking maybe a polarizing. I've also been trying the understand the differences between a graduate neutral density and a neutral density filter if there is one.
    Last edited by Kytus; 12th January 2005 at 09:47 AM.

  2. #2

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    you are purchasing ND filter to improve photographs that are taken in low lught and cloudly condition? where do you get this idea from?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kytus
    I've also been trying the understand the differences between a graduate neutral density and a neutral density filter if there is one.
    Thinks he mixup this two kinds of filters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kytus
    As a part of my new years resolution to become a better photographer I went to photography shop and purchased a Neutral Density filter. My hopes are that this will improve photographs that are taken in low light and cloudly contions. The only filter I purchased was a +2. I plan to add the the rest of the filter values once I learned to use this filter better. What other light conditions are approriate to use the ND filter and what F-stop and shutter speeds should be used in suck instances? Also I learned recently that I can screw one filter on top of another yet I don't hear much about this what other filter should I use with the ND filter, I was thinking maybe a polarizing. I've also been trying the understand the differences between a graduate neutral density and a neutral density filter if there is one.
    ND filter is not to improve photos in low light and cloudly conditions. I think you had mistaken!
    The purpose of a ND filter is to cut down light from entering the lens. Say my camera max. shutter speed is 1/1000sec but the light condition require a higher shutter speed than my camera's max shutter speed. So therefore I use a ND filter to stop-down.
    I would suggest you read some basic photography books about 'Understanding exposure' and etc.
    Last edited by XXX Boy; 12th January 2005 at 10:20 AM.

  5. #5

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    ND filter is to reduce light entering the lens, thus its to slow down shutter speed in bright light (to make speed trails) or GND is used to eg; reduce the brightness of the sky in contrast to the ground/sea/building...

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    Quote Originally Posted by popeye
    you are purchasing ND filter to improve photographs that are taken in low lught and cloudly condition? where do you get this idea from?
    Precisely... ND is to hold back the highlights such as bright sky/sun while maintaining the details for the subject. dude.

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    Kytus, like the rest have chimed, you've got ND filters all wrong. Also, stacking filters is possible but not recommended as you run the risk of vignetting, ie. you see little black round edges in your shot-frame. About grad. density filters, those are filters where about half of the filter-glass is darkened in a gradual progression, to allow you to reduce horizon and sky glare while keeping the foreground subject lightened - ie. usually for landscape shots.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nemesis32
    Precisely... ND is to hold back the highlights such as bright sky/sun while maintaining the details for the subject. dude.
    ???

    May I know you are talking about ND filter or graduate ND filter?

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    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights
    ???

    May I know you are talking about ND filter or graduate ND filter?
    Oppss.. what i describe is graduated ND. i believe he bought grad ND and not normal ND as normal ND just reduce light coming in for the whole pic. If thats what he needs, he can actually use a cir-polarisor which is a ND as well but helps to improve colour saturation and cut down on reflection etc.

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  11. #11
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    Wow look at all the people freakin out WOWOWOW itís like I killed someone. Why does it take 8 people to tell me the same thing I must have committed a religious offense. Iím sorry; please donít hurt me over my mistake. The last time I check this was the NEWBIE forum!!!!

  12. #12
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kytus
    Wow look at all the people freakin out WOWOWOW itís like I killed someone. Why does it take 8 people to tell me the same thing I must have committed a religious offense. Iím sorry; please donít hurt me over my mistake. The last time I check this was the NEWBIE forum!!!!
    This shows people here are how eager to help each other and share knowledge.

    Donít worry.

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