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Thread: Studio Light?

  1. #1

    Default Studio Light?

    Anyone know where I can get a set of continuous lighting studio lights?

    Preferable with barn door and stand.
    Only using for home lighting, so quality & output need not be excellent..


    Thanks...

  2. #2
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    I think Cathay at Peninsular has those, not cheap though.

  3. #3

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    Maybe don't need 'studio' lights. Just need cheap bright light and control from there?
    http://www.lonestardigital.com/affordable_lighting.htm

  4. #4

    Lightbulb

    hardware or diy stores usually carry various types of lights. those used to light up shop fronts, signages or banners. no barndoors though.

    an alternative, rent hotlights with barndoors.

  5. #5
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    someone in yahoo auction is selling... bought a boom from him b4, can deal with him... got good ratings as well... brand is falconeyes.
    Logging Off. "You have 2,631 messages stored, of a total 400 allowed." don't PM me.

  6. #6

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    Ahhh... Thanks all...

    I can't possibly have 1000W or 500W blasting onto my walls for hours.
    Just wanna create the mood with maybe a couple of not so powerful lights. 1 thing is gotta look like studio lights though..

    Anymore ideas pls keep them pouring in ok?

  7. #7
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    There's a shop at Sim Lim Tower (3/4 flr) that may meet your requirements.
    Check it out. Forget the Name
    Mostly China made lights.

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    i think you're talking about studio "hot" lights rite? the type used by TV/video crews? Ruby Photo carries them, you can check them out.

  9. #9

    Lightbulb

    like smith victor, etc.

  10. #10

    Default

    How about the cheap lighting gear from Eastgear ?

  11. #11

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    One simple and cheap way is to use a bulb. Chose the wattage you want. Then fashion a "reflector" with aluminium foil. Shoot it neat this way for a dramatic lighting or through a umbrella (find a way to put the umbrella in front of the bulb) and you get a very soft light.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by AReality
    Ahhh... Thanks all...

    I can't possibly have 1000W or 500W blasting onto my walls for hours.
    Just wanna create the mood with maybe a couple of not so powerful lights. 1 thing is gotta look like studio lights though..

    Anymore ideas pls keep them pouring in ok?
    mm? i thought continuous lighting like tungsten 'redheads' generate a lot more heat, whereas studio flashes are also known as 'cold' lights.

    another alternative to less heaty continous lighting sources are lights that use HMI. they produce lots more power n color temperature is much closer to daylight. but needless to say, those can be even more expensive than flash strobes.

    i believe what you are looking for, is those fresnel type tungsten lights. agree with fantom, you can find them in that video equip shop at Sim Lim Towers. can be gotten for a few hundred or less.. give them a visit?

    i'm sure you are already aware, you probably need a much longer shutter speed and color correction gels, compared to using flash strobes.

  13. #13

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by Stereobox
    mm? i thought continuous lighting like tungsten 'redheads' generate a lot more heat, whereas studio flashes are also known as 'cold' lights.

    another alternative to less heaty continous lighting sources are lights that use HMI. they produce lots more power n color temperature is much closer to daylight. but needless to say, those can be even more expensive than flash strobes.

    i believe what you are looking for, is those fresnel type tungsten lights. agree with fantom, you can find them in that video equip shop at Sim Lim Towers. can be gotten for a few hundred or less.. give them a visit?

    i'm sure you are already aware, you probably need a much longer shutter speed and color correction gels, compared to using flash strobes.
    'more expensive' is kinda of an understatement. closer to 'substantially more expensive', IMO. my sense is that the thread starter is not looking for 'commercial quality' types.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AReality
    Ahhh... Thanks all...

    I can't possibly have 1000W or 500W blasting onto my walls for hours.
    Just wanna create the mood with maybe a couple of not so powerful lights. 1 thing is gotta look like studio lights though..

    Anymore ideas pls keep them pouring in ok?
    I think that for us to give you more information, you will have to give more information what you intend to do. For your information, I use only continuous light for my photography. I have both color corrected types and non-color corrected types.

    1 You want to have continuous light. Continuous light will generate heat. But depending on where and how you shoot, it may not even be unbearably hot. In the last couple of weeks, two CSer's brought models for me to photograph. They can testify that the models did not feel "hot" at all! In fact one model was so glad when I asked her to put on a cardigan! Of course, I was photographing them in an aircond environment.

    2 Tungsten light is not suitable for colors. Even if you use tungten color films, the colors are not "good". You can still use them if you use digital and shoot in raw.

    There are continuous light that are color corrected. But these generally have poor output and as one post indicated, will need slow shutter speed and wide aperture.

    3 From what you described, a home made set up is not what you want. you want barn doors etc that look like studio lights. For the purpose of "home lights" these are unnecessary. But you want them! So you have to get commercial ones. On the whole, tungten lights are a lot cheaper than strobes, unless you go for fancy ones with focussing/fresnel abilities.

    Your posts indicate that you are not clear in your intentions, or at least from what I can read.

    "for home use"
    "quality and output not be excellent"
    "with barn doors and stand" (indicate a "packaged"set-up")
    "gotta look like studio lights"
    "can't have 1000w or 500 w blasting into my walls for hours" - (a) you don't have to! (b) BTW my average light output during shoot is 2000W,that is because I shoot through a translucent umbrella. Barndoors are unnecessary for me.
    "couple of not so powerful lights"

    But looks is important to you! So you are talking commercial set-ups!

    So what do you really want and want to do with the lights?

  15. #15
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    if you have a 'cheap, home-made' kind of continuous lighting set up, you might have something that might look 'good' .. but you are going to have trouble controlling the light. try controlling and shaping light from a bare bulb! you are going to probably end up sticking gaffer/masking tape all over the lights just to shape and dodge. not to mention, you probably have to put the light very close to the subject!

    take the common consensus that you should get one of those tungsten fresnel type that comes with barn doors and spot/flood modes. makes your photographic life a whole lot more convenient. shouldn't cost too much as most of us had mentioned.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stereobox
    if you have a 'cheap, home-made' kind of continuous lighting set up, you might have something that might look 'good' .. but you are going to have trouble controlling the light. try controlling and shaping light from a bare bulb! you are going to probably end up sticking gaffer/masking tape all over the lights just to shape and dodge. not to mention, you probably have to put the light very close to the subject!

    take the common consensus that you should get one of those tungsten fresnel type that comes with barn doors and spot/flood modes. makes your photographic life a whole lot more convenient. shouldn't cost too much as most of us had mentioned.
    Having used continuous for more than 3 years, and having used Elinchrom and Tota lights and "flourescent" color corrected lights, and Dedolights ( all continuous light), I discovered that for shaping light in the conventional sense for portraits, I don't need barndoors. But I do shape lights, and when I do, the barndoors and fresnel are useless. The usual fresnel are too imprecise for my purposes, with or without barndoors. If there is opportunity, I can show you my work, all done without barndoors! And I do have barndoors sitting in my box, retired! Maybe one day I just might sell them!

    The issue is what Areality wants. An instrument is only as good as you want it to be for the purpose it is designed for. Until Areality clarifies his purpose, the advice that can be given is just "general advice".

    But if I were to start with monetary considerations, I will use a bulb with an aluminium foil, and SHOOT IT TROUGH AN UMBRELLA. You will get the msot flattering ligth for portraits that equal any more expensive commercial set-up! For drama a bare bulb can be fantastic, PROVIDED YOU KNOW HOW TO WORK WITH THE LIGHT AT HAND.

  17. #17
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    ok...then have to "duo1 duo1 zi3 jiao4" from you already

    for me, the purpose of having the barndoors n fresnel available is mainly to control the amount of flood and light spillage coming out from the lights. like you have mentioned, if you are doing portraits, perhaps light spillage isn't that big a problem. but if you are taking in a wider scene, it would perhaps become necessary to have more light control preferably.

    then again, i suppose the thread starter just wants something for his home portraiture studio.

    that said, i agree continuous lighting is good in the sense that you can really see how the light is falling on the subject, especially when you are trying to diffuse it, and since it's continuous, it won't be distracting to the subject with pops of flashes.

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