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Thread: This, I agree with

  1. #21
    Member 9V-Orion Images's Avatar
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    Default Re: This, I agree with

    Quote Originally Posted by ricohflex View Post
    Prolonged war is impossible for us.
    That's absolutely right, the official mission of the SAF is to "secure a swift and decisive victory" and it ain't just written that way for the sake of it. It is critical for us to cripple our enemies' defences and any meaningful ability for them to retaliate within hours.

    Quote Originally Posted by ricohflex View Post
    Singapore is too small for defence-in-depth.
    There is not enough land to execute strategic withdrawal.
    Not necessary. To our defence planners our Area of Operation (AO) actually stretches over some 19,210 square kilometer. If we do have to fight a war on the mainland of Singapore that would have already signified a possible total decimation of the combined arms division.

    There is a reason for the existence of palm oil and rubber plantations on Pulau Tekong (such a sensitive area was even "showcased" in The Straits Times) not to mention the fact that Singapore is not a signatory of the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention AKA "Ottawa Treaty" when our neighbours are, and also, we do have unit or units trained in Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) warfare.

    Please go figure yourself what is the significance of all these. ;) As my friend always says "you don't put on a condom unless you're gonna ****!"

    Quote Originally Posted by ricohflex View Post
    Things can change very fast. People's attitude to us can change very fast.
    Yup, the world went from peace to two world wars in just within 25 years.
    Last edited by 9V-Orion Images; 23rd May 2012 at 09:25 PM. Reason: Note: All Information Posted Are Available Within The Public Domain.
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  2. #22
    Deregistered allenleonhart's Avatar
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    Default Re: This, I agree with

    Quote Originally Posted by kei1309 View Post
    Doesn't seem to be the case anymore
    and it not necessarily works on everyone. it can worsen some cases.

  3. #23
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    Default Re: This, I agree with

    Quote Originally Posted by 9V-Orion Images View Post
    There is a reason for the existence of palm oil and rubber plantations on Pulau Tekong (such a sensitive area was even "showcased" The Straits Times) not to mention the fact that Singapore is not a signatory of the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention AKA "Ottawa Treaty" when our neighbours are, and also, we do have unit or units trained in Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) warfare.

    Please go figure yourself what is the significance of all these. As my friend always says "you don't put on a condom unless you're gonna ****!"
    .
    if they really wanna war, 1 biggie drop over no more singapore loh. singapore is too ridiculously small. cross nation warfare is unlikely. terrorism is more likely.

  4. #24
    Member 9V-Orion Images's Avatar
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    Default Re: This, I agree with

    Quote Originally Posted by allenleonhart View Post
    if they really wanna war, 1 biggie drop over no more singapore loh. singapore is too ridiculously small. cross nation warfare is unlikely. terrorism is more likely.
    We have to be realistic here. We have to prioritise what our biggest threats are and right now our biggest threat with their McDonnell Douglas F/A-18D Hornets can't even drop **** literally as said by Dr. M himself.
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  5. #25
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    Guy need to go ns is not for war but for our own soil. Any riot, just press 1 button. No report, tio charge, ha ha! But ns gd only for making us fit n also, become a man from boy.
    Only Sony device mostly, haha!

  6. #26

    Default Re: This, I agree with

    Quote Originally Posted by 9V-Orion Images View Post
    We have to be realistic here. We have to prioritise what our biggest threats are and right now our biggest threat with their McDonnell Douglas F/A-18D Hornets can't even drop **** literally as said by Dr. M himself.
    "these aircraft cannot be use to / for any attack against any country.. even if it is not Singapore" Mahatir

  7. #27

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    Actually our relationship with our neighbors are very good. Those who have met and trained with our Malaysian and Indonesian counterparts will know.

    By the way, when soldiers of our neighbors see our combat ration, they all start to curse their chief of defence force Our so called 3G army now damn good life....BMT machiam go for cabin crew selection. Last time, we are lucky if we can book in without Ali Baba bag on our head....

  8. #28

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    I disagreed. Total waste of "our" money to someone else pocket indirectly in the procurement process. *think*
    Create FEAR, justify more budget from "our" money every year.

    Spend $ on "look and sound sophisticated" technology, but end of the day, it is the person behind that matters most.
    Unfortunately, they are still paying peanuts to our soldiers and NS men.
    | 5Diii | 24 ii | 40 | 24-70 ii | 24-105 | 70-200 F4 IS | 270 ii | 600EX-RT |

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by ahboy168
    Unfortunately, they are still paying peanuts to our soldiers and NS men.
    Bro u mean regular or NSF? Last I know, the NSF pay have more than doubled compared to 10 years ago...
    "Time is often the best editor" - Alex Webb

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfton

    Bro u mean regular or NSF? Last I know, the NSF pay have more than doubled compared to 10 years ago...
    Esp nowadays family are richer than our parent last time. So, those salary from army, they can use for their own stuffs. Plus cook hse food so gd nowadays, canteen for standby only. Some even close down, if that camp unactive with reservist. Only thing i hate is the ippt/rt n that y i no defer my ict, i MR asap. Heh heh!
    Only Sony device mostly, haha!

  11. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by wolfton

    Bro u mean regular or NSF? Last I know, the NSF pay have more than doubled compared to 10 years ago...
    Just curious, how much is say a CPL NSF pay now?
    Is it higher than our toilet cleaner?
    | 5Diii | 24 ii | 40 | 24-70 ii | 24-105 | 70-200 F4 IS | 270 ii | 600EX-RT |

  12. #32

    Default Re: This, I agree with

    Quote Originally Posted by ahboy168 View Post
    I disagreed. Total waste of "our" money to someone else pocket indirectly in the procurement process. *think*
    Create FEAR, justify more budget from "our" money every year.

    Spend $ on "look and sound sophisticated" technology, but end of the day, it is the person behind that matters most.
    Unfortunately, they are still paying peanuts to our soldiers and NS men.
    HOW MUCH DO YOU WANT FOR DOING YOUR DUTY??

  13. #33

    Default Re: This, I agree with

    Quote Originally Posted by ahboy168 View Post
    Just curious, how much is say a CPL NSF pay now?
    Is it higher than our toilet cleaner?
    Bro seriously I do not know.....where to see the figure? I only know now NSF officers are paid a full time restaurant manager pay, seems to be the case. CPL should have $600 bah....

    Actually if stay in, some can even save lots of their NSF pay. But really, NSF nowadays should not complain liao....really not bad already. We only get about $170-$200 as a recruit last time

  14. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by acpical

    HOW MUCH DO YOU WANT FOR DOING YOUR DUTY??
    If it is for duty, zero.
    If it is to support a group of commercial entities, then it is a different story.
    Btw, I am not a regular or NSF.
    Last edited by ahboy168; 23rd May 2012 at 11:53 PM.
    | 5Diii | 24 ii | 40 | 24-70 ii | 24-105 | 70-200 F4 IS | 270 ii | 600EX-RT |

  15. #35
    Moderator ed9119's Avatar
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    Default Re: This, I agree with

    Quote Originally Posted by lotus80 View Post
    Can we disable enemy's Internet access ?
    lolzz !!!
    shaddap and just shoot .... up close
    Walkeast

  16. #36
    Moderator ed9119's Avatar
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    Default Re: This, I agree with

    IN FOCUS: Singapore steps up deterrent capabilities

    This month's Singapore air show falls on the 70th anniversary of the fall of Singapore to Japan in the Second World War. While Asia is an unimaginably different place now, Singapore's leaders have never forgotten the speed with which Singapore fell - or the three years of brutal occupation that followed.

    Memories of the war have played no small part in the development of Singapore's world-class military, backed with what is unquestionably southeast Asia's most powerful air force. While Singapore will never have the strategic depth of a larger nation, its advanced military will create a "poison shrimp" dynamic to give any aggressor pause.

    The Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) is unique in southeast Asia. Apart from being the region's largest, it is also the best trained, led, and equipped. It places a high priority on maintaining its equipment to ensure both readiness and safety. While political concerns are inevitably a part of acquisition decisions, it chooses aircraft and weapons systems based mainly on their utility in combat - something that is not always the primary consideration in other countries.

    Tim Huxley is an analyst at the International Institute of Strategic Studies, and has written a book about Singapore's armed forces. "Over the last forty years, Singapore's air force has evolved incrementally toward having an extremely powerful capability by regional standards," he says.

    "This is not just in terms of modernity and weapons, but in the way equipment integrates to form an overall air capability. It is an integrated and well-balanced force, and careful thought has been given to logistics."

    For the time being, Singapore appears content with its fighter fleet. The RSAF has yet to reveal its future fighter procurement plans, and there is no major competition under way to obtain new fighters. Indeed, the last of Singapore's Boeing F-15SGs - a variant of the F-15E - have yet to be delivered. Nonetheless, Singapore will eventually need to make decisions about its future force structure.

    Analysts and industry experts interviewed for this article are all but unanimous that Singapore will one day obtain Lockheed Martin's F-35. Like Israel, Singapore is a tier four "security co-operation participant" in the programme. While it cannot influence the design of the aircraft, it has access to programme information and can request special studies. Sources say Singapore could also be interested in the F-35B, the type's short take-off and vertical landing variant.

    Huxley says Singapore's tier four status is appropriate because the eventual size of any Singapore F-35 buy would not have justified the country being a founding partner in the programme. "In all military areas Singapore tries, where possible, to acquire a qualitative edge over possible contenders, and other countries feel that only the F-35 offers this qualitative edge in the future. There is no other similar equipment in the pipeline, and it's effectively the only potential in terms of a new airframe."

    Richard Bitzinger, senior fellow of the Military Transformations programme at Singapore's Rajaratnam School of International Studies, thinks Singapore could eventually buy up to 100 F-35s. "Delays in the F-35 programme are not a problem for Singapore because they probably won't place an order for several more years anyway," he says. "In 2015, I could see them upgrading some of their [Lockheed Martin] F-16s, and also ordering 40-odd F-35s, with an additional F-35 order perhaps in 2020."

    Given Singapore's long history with the F-16. it is a leading candidate to upgrade these aircraft. In this it would follow Taiwan and South Korea, which in 2011 disclosed plans to upgrade their F-16 fleets. The salient element of these upgrades is the addition of an active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar. The contenders are Northrop Grumman's Scalable Agile Beam Radar and Raytheon's Advanced Combat Radar. Industry sources say the first AESA to win an order will be all but assured to hold the entire F-16 AESA upgrade market and, by default, ascertain the eventual radar modification for Singapore's F-16s.

    Bitzinger says an F-16 upgrade could also see Singapore retire the last of its venerable Northrop F-5s, which have been in service since the 1970s.......

    ......... "The last thing the Singaporeans want is to fight last-ditch battles on Singaporean soil," he adds. "A lot of this goes back to the fall of Singapore in 1942. That history is very poignant to them - the idea that once the Japanese crossed the straits of Johore, it was all over. They never want to have this happen again. They will take the war to the enemy."
    shaddap and just shoot .... up close
    Walkeast

  17. #37

    Default Re: This, I agree with

    NS serves a lot of things:

    1) to protect the citizens
    2) to train citizens to protect themselves
    3) to protect our friends and family
    4) to protect the investors in our country.

    now, number 4 might seem like ??? to most. but without foreign investment, do you think we can be what we are today?

    NS also shows the world that we're interested in making this place safe not only for our citizens, but also for their money and businesses

  18. #38
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    Default Re: This, I agree with

    Timor Leste (formerly East Timor) is a lesson on what can happen if you do not have a strong defence. After Portugal hurriedly left East Timor, there was a power vacuum.
    Nearby power seized the chance to take over East Timor. The aggressor sent in their troops and used some of the local East Timor population to turn against their fellow countrymen, former friends and neighbours. There were massacres. It can happen to us.

    Diplomacy is good. But diplomacy is no use if you are weak and others have decided to invade.
    Japan staged the Marco Polo bridge incident as an excuse to invade China. Diplomacy did not stop Japan invading China.
    Hitler staged an attack against a German radio station in Gleiwitz, as an excuse to invade Poland. Diplomacy did not stop Nazi Germany invading Poland.
    Last edited by ricohflex; 24th May 2012 at 12:58 AM.

  19. #39

    Default Re: This, I agree with

    Quote Originally Posted by ricohflex View Post
    Timor Leste (formerly East Timor) is a lesson on what can happen if you do not have a strong defence. After Portugal hurriedly left East Timor, there was a power vacuum.
    Nearby power seized the chance to take over East Timor. The aggressor sent in their troops and used some of the local East Timor population to turn against their fellow countrymen, former friends and neighbours. There were massacres. It can happen to us.

    Diplomacy is good. But diplomacy is no use if you are weak and others have decided to invade.
    Japan staged the Marco Polo bridge incident as an excuse to invade China. Diplomacy did not stop Japan invading China.
    Hitler staged an attack against a German radio station in Gleiwitz, as an excuse to invade Poland. Diplomacy did not stop Nazi Germany invading Poland.
    We need both diplomacy and saf. your allies may not be able to send their troops to aid you in time if they themselves are at war. that's what happened in WWII in singapore. so we need a strong army to protect ourselves and stall some time for other allies to help u

  20. #40

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    Can we just outsourced to US. So every year fixed operating cost for "protection money".
    Then free up more resources for work force.
    Why reinvent the wheel ?
    | 5Diii | 24 ii | 40 | 24-70 ii | 24-105 | 70-200 F4 IS | 270 ii | 600EX-RT |

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