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Thread: Used mountain bike recommendation!

  1. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by patch17
    nice set of wheels kex.

    bring along an extra inner tube, a patch kit, a set of tyre levers, a little minoura tool set, and a pump. i usually use elastic to secure the patch kit, levers and tool set to the rolled up inner tube then secure the whole thing under the saddle with a toe strap, or a velcro strap. (it's an old road biker trick from long, long ago.)

    riding around the island is fine with 1 water bottle you can get water practically everywhere. but if your'e going overseas, attach another bottle cage and bring two LARGE water bottles and/or carry a camelbak hydration pack. you can never have enough water. the camelbak can also hold some food, money, ID and a phone.
    i have no idea how to mend a punctured tyre leh

    if i even got a flat tyre while riding,i think i just take a cab home with it

    i just changed the tyres to a semi slick maxxis($70) yesterday,it is no longer wad u see on the pix.. dunno wad type of tyres they call it,something TT or wad..

    mmmmrsia,where u want to ride to on thursday?any particular route ?
    i am almost free anytime after 8.30pm

    i can be reached at 96828667

  2. #122

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    I got a newbie question, there is a bike they call hard tail and there is a bike which full suspension. What are the type of situations where hard tail is the use, same goes to full suspension bike where it is ideal to use? I have a full suspension and I noticed that riding in a flat surface kinda absorbed my leg power rather than converting it to speed. Why I prefer full suspension? It is for the simple reason that I will not have a swollen crotch/backside after a long ride. Can someone share some info..

  3. #123
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kex
    dun like those riding tights leh..expensive somemore,rodalink selling $65 for one..wah piang..

    thinking of getting the gel padding for my seat,only $13+ nia..

    will be riding the changi prison route tonite if weather is good.

    anyone game for a ride tonite ?
    Looking at your bike again...I can see your saddle is more like a slim racer kind. If you can get use to this that quickly then I think you should be fine. Or are you so excited over your purchase you are mentally push out the pain receptical from your rear region? LOL.

    Yes padded racing shorts or those MTB shorts with the padded piece is kinda pricey. But you should be able to get a good pair for about $50 if you take your time to look around. Your other option is to buy the padded tight which you wear like your under garment before you wear your short. It is a thin cooling tight with the padding. The brand is called PACE. You should be able to find them in all bike shops. I use that sometime as "extra buffer" especially If I have not ride a lonnnng time and want to attempt one of those long rides. It does help. Wash it gently after each ride so that it last longer because it can get worn out and the fabric starts to unravel like those girl's stocking heheh. They usually could last you about 1 yrs. It is about $16-22 I think..i have not bought a pair in on year so not so sure. It is black so it match anything lah. I also use those bermuda type MTB shorts..abit more pricey in the $50 - 150 but they are not bad as you can double them as normal casual wear if you get those that allow you to detach the inner padded tights.

    But for not...take that as something to consider later lah...you have spent alot already man...keep some for Chinese New Year clothing! heh... You can get those abit later lah.

  4. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmmrsia
    I got a newbie question, there is a bike they call hard tail and there is a bike which full suspension. What are the type of situations where hard tail is the use, same goes to full suspension bike where it is ideal to use? I have a full suspension and I noticed that riding in a flat surface kinda absorbed my leg power rather than converting it to speed. Why I prefer full suspension? It is for the simple reason that I will not have a swollen crotch/backside after a long ride. Can someone share some info..
    well, each type has it's uses depending on the type of riding you do.

    full sup bikes are good for heavy off road riding. 2 - 3 inches rear travel and 4 inch front should be enough for most trails around singapore. pure downhill machines will have 6 to 7 inches behind and just as much, or even more, travel in front to handle the boulder size bumps and canyon deep dips.

    imo, full sup bikes aren't necessary for riding around singapore roads and paths. a lot of power is loss when the rear of the bike compresses on the down stroke. hence, a "bouncy" feeling.

    a hard tail is just that, a rigid rear end. only suspension is the air in your tyres, the foam of your saddle and, in some cases, the blubber of your behind. power transfer to the rear wheels on the down stroke is not compromised by suspension. this kind of bike is fine for most trail and road riding conditions and is the prefered choice by serious racers.
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  5. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by kex
    dun like those riding tights leh..expensive somemore,rodalink selling $65 for one..wah piang..

    thinking of getting the gel padding for my seat,only $13+ nia..

    will be riding the changi prison route tonite if weather is good.

    anyone game for a ride tonite ?
    my suggestion is not to skimp on buying cheap cycling shorts. get one with a decent amount of padding and a soft chamois lining covering the pad. you do realize that one does not wear under wear (jocks or boxers) when wearing cycling shorts.

    the reason why the shorts are tight around the crotch region is to pevent "chaffing" or rubbing of the clothes between the legs and the saddle. so placing a "rough" cotton undergarment between the soft chamois lining and your legs can cause uncomfortable and in some cases painful ummm... "blisters" in the joy-joy area.

    as i was saying, save up and spend a bit more for a decent pair of cycling shorts. i found out that after a few washes, the cheap short's lining started to stiffen and got quite rough that it became useless in preventing chaffing. the more expensive short's lining stayed soft and smooth a whole lot longer.
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  6. #126

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    Quote Originally Posted by kex
    i have no idea how to mend a punctured tyre leh

    if i even got a flat tyre while riding,i think i just take a cab home with it

    i just changed the tyres to a semi slick maxxis($70) yesterday,it is no longer wad u see on the pix.. dunno wad type of tyres they call it,something TT or wad..

    mmmmrsia,where u want to ride to on thursday?any particular route ?
    i am almost free anytime after 8.30pm

    i can be reached at 96828667
    I will confirm to you a day before that. I have n idea of the routes thats why I like to tag along. I once cycle from EC Park all the way up to NSRCC until I reached and cycle near the airport runway but I decided to u turn I am not familiar with the place already.

    patch17, thanks very much for the reply.

  7. #127
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patch17
    it's a "bow" bike by Corratec. probably going to be the last bike i'll ever buy. (can't believe i built the thing more than 6 years ago!) though i still have two other "classics".

    one is a Wild West (by Bridgestone), full Tange Prestige tubing, XT drive train (with thumb shifters), and beautiful Ritchey Logic componets all around. the other one is a '93 Specialized Stumpjumper Comp. Tange Prestige tubing, XT components all around, with Specialized inhouse rims and wheels. both bikes are fully rigid, ridden, raced and maintained.

    unfortunately the Stumpjumper has become a donor for components to do up my wife's Rockhopper, and the Wild West is now living with my road racer brother. (his bike is a Trek OCLV Lance Armstrong replica complete with Dura Ace components. the WHOLE bike weighs in at around 6.5 to 7 kg and it's not just a show bike, he's got a number of medals and trophies to back it up too.)

    OUtstanding!...Sound's like to me you have a family of cyclists! heh. I heard of this name Corratec before but sometime back. European by origin. Not sure which part though. But definitely as european as Orange MTB I reckon. I used to subcribe to some British MTB magazine when I run out of things to read about MTB from the States heheh. The stumpjumpers & rockhoppers are workhorse bikes from Specialized that never fail to live up to their reputation all these years. And now you are swapping parts? heh. You don't want the stumpjumper frame you let me know! heh.

    That is about the only thing i like from Trek that is their OCLV frames for both road and mountain bikes. They are very stiff frames but cost a pretty penny that's for sure. I tried the first OCLV MTB when it was brought in sometime in 1996. Your brother has the replica Lance Armstrong model? The recent one? I saw the latest model paint job when I was following the Tour de France on the TV and website...looks really cool. For now, I can't see myself buying another bike just yet but who knows..

  8. #128
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    Quote Originally Posted by sammy888
    OUtstanding!...Sound's like to me you have a family of cyclists! heh. I heard of this name Corratec before but sometime back. European by origin. Not sure which part though. But definitely as european as Orange MTB I reckon. I used to subcribe to some British MTB magazine when I run out of things to read about MTB from the States heheh. The stumpjumpers & rockhoppers are workhorse bikes from Specialized that never fail to live up to their reputation all these years. And now you are swapping parts? heh. You don't want the stumpjumper frame you let me know! heh.

    That is about the only thing i like from Trek that is their OCLV frames for both road and mountain bikes. They are very stiff frames but cost a pretty penny that's for sure. I tried the first OCLV MTB when it was brought in sometime in 1996. Your brother has the replica Lance Armstrong model? The recent one? I saw the latest model paint job when I was following the Tour de France on the TV and website...looks really cool. For now, I can't see myself buying another bike just yet but who knows..
    hahaha... her bike came over only as a frame and fork, and she couldn't use my Stumpjumper because it was too big. so i used it as a donor bike to get hers up and running. (sob)

    As for my brother's Trek, he got it in 2003, started out with Shimano 600 componentry, but then upgraded to full Dura Ace in 2004. he's got the full Lance Armstrong kit too, jersey, bib shorts, shoes and helmet. he's full on about cycling. he'll ride 2 or 3 times a week, a usual training ride for him is 120+ kms. then race on the weekends. i picked up his bike once and i reckon his whole bike weighed less than my frame alone. yeah, the whole bike cost many, many pretty pennies and an arm and a leg too, say AU$ 6k. but that's his passion, so he saves up for better and lighter components.
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  9. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by sammy888
    But if you keep hanging at those places instead of riding...you start to build this mentality your bike like your camera is never good enough ..and you start to upgrade to no end.
    this is called, the Itchy Backside Syndrome, compounded occasionally by that @#^%^ saddle

    kex, for MTB, if you're using a pair of slicks (those without XC knobs), you can ride off-road (not XC but pavement/grass/sand etc) without fear of having thin tires cutting through the terrain and slipping you over.

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    patch17, may i know your brother's name? should have heard of him, since the local scene is kind of small

    kex, FYI, cycling tights are priced around that region. and those gel addition to your saddle will kill your crotch faster than you believe it will. they're meant for those who think they're sitting on a chair instead of a saddle, contacting it by the entire bum. truth is, when you cycle, you sit on your sit bones. the gel covers can do harm, because as the sit bones press down and compress part of the gel cover, the rest that has soft tissue, will have circulation slowed down by the excess gel, which acts as a "flow control" device.

  11. #131
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    wah so cheem ar..

    anyway,my frd who gave up riding wants to pass me a rudy project jersey,gloves and a bib shorts,those that looks like king kong bundee shorts..
    hehehe...

    just did a 30km+ ride after work,the changi prison slopes are quite a work out manz..

    can't imagine doing a 120km ride!!!

    wah piang..*salute*

  12. #132

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    Quote Originally Posted by sehsuan
    patch17, may i know your brother's name? should have heard of him, since the local scene is kind of small

    kex, FYI, cycling tights are priced around that region. and those gel addition to your saddle will kill your crotch faster than you believe it will. they're meant for those who think they're sitting on a chair instead of a saddle, contacting it by the entire bum. truth is, when you cycle, you sit on your sit bones. the gel covers can do harm, because as the sit bones press down and compress part of the gel cover, the rest that has soft tissue, will have circulation slowed down by the excess gel, which acts as a "flow control" device.
    Ya ya, Ah Suan's right. Having an overly cushioned saddle means that the cushion will press against the soft tissue area & cut off blood circulation to the important bits - giving you numbness and future problems.

    Dun worry - if you ride twice a week, very soon you will find youself doing 2-3 rounds of the coastal rd/prison route easily.
    Ride safe!

  13. #133

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    Narrow, hard saddle is best. Preferably with the hole in the middle, to relieve pressure on your pudendal nerve (so that your little brother does not go numb). Your weight will rest on your "sit" bones, rather than crushing your family jewels into the gel.

    If you have bum problems, neck problems or wrist problems, then consider a recumbent:


  14. #134
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patch17
    hahaha... her bike came over only as a frame and fork, and she couldn't use my Stumpjumper because it was too big. so i used it as a donor bike to get hers up and running. (sob)

    As for my brother's Trek, he got it in 2003, started out with Shimano 600 componentry, but then upgraded to full Dura Ace in 2004. he's got the full Lance Armstrong kit too, jersey, bib shorts, shoes and helmet. he's full on about cycling. he'll ride 2 or 3 times a week, a usual training ride for him is 120+ kms. then race on the weekends. i picked up his bike once and i reckon his whole bike weighed less than my frame alone. yeah, the whole bike cost many, many pretty pennies and an arm and a leg too, say AU$ 6k. but that's his passion, so he saves up for better and lighter components.
    YOur brother sounds like a huge fan of Armstrong and is motivated to follow his "pedal steps" heh. A really good road racer is mighty light that's for sure. I had a colnago years back with campagnolo parts which was pretty light for it's day but by today's standard, they are just about as light if not lighter and stiffer where it's needed but also alittle weaker where it is not so relevant. But that is how they balance strength to weight ratio I guess. Your bro is working towards turning Pro I reckon?

    This is Armstrong on the 2003 Trek road racer he won with...I guess your Bro's bike should be this model. Cool frame.

  15. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by sehsuan
    patch17, may i know your brother's name? should have heard of him, since the local scene is kind of small

    kex, FYI, cycling tights are priced around that region. and those gel addition to your saddle will kill your crotch faster than you believe it will. they're meant for those who think they're sitting on a chair instead of a saddle, contacting it by the entire bum. truth is, when you cycle, you sit on your sit bones. the gel covers can do harm, because as the sit bones press down and compress part of the gel cover, the rest that has soft tissue, will have circulation slowed down by the excess gel, which acts as a "flow control" device.
    sorry sehsuan, my brother lives in Australia.
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  16. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by sammy888
    YOur brother sounds like a huge fan of Armstrong and is motivated to follow his "pedal steps" heh. A really good road racer is mighty light that's for sure. I had a colnago years back with campagnolo parts which was pretty light for it's day but by today's standard, they are just about as light if not lighter and stiffer where it's needed but also alittle weaker where it is not so relevant. But that is how they balance strength to weight ratio I guess. Your bro is working towards turning Pro I reckon?

    This is Armstrong on the 2003 Trek road racer he won with...I guess your Bro's bike should be this model. Cool frame.
    it's something like that. it may not be an exact copy of Lance Armstrong's bike, but it's basically the bike the US Postal team rides.

    nah, he's not working towards turning pro. but cycling is his passion, and he engages in it with the equal fervor and motivation as his idol.
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  17. #137
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patch17
    it's something like that. it may not be an exact copy of Lance Armstrong's bike, but it's basically the bike the US Postal team rides.

    nah, he's not working towards turning pro. but cycling is his passion, and he engages in it with the equal fervor and motivation as his idol.

    Talking about your bro's idol.... Amstrong just signed up to ride for my favorite cable channel, " DISCOVERY". There is a whole lot of info at the discovery channel website on him,the news and fo course the TREK BIKE. Man I hope he will will the "TOUR" for the 7th year man.

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    Quote Originally Posted by patch17
    sorry sehsuan, my brother lives in Australia.
    not a problem. here's my newly built up bike - new stem and fork coming up next month


  19. #139

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    Quote Originally Posted by sehsuan
    not a problem. here's my newly built up bike - new stem and fork coming up next month

    wah nice (what happened to the pink bike frame? )

    What fork are you changing the manitou to??

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    Quote Originally Posted by kng
    What fork are you changing the manitou to??
    um to the one almost everyone is using?

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