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Thread: Champions League final

  1. #21

    Default Re: Champions League final

    Quote Originally Posted by zaren View Post
    most likely heading back to spain .... lol
    would expect a few more big spenders fr the other leagues to be in contention..
    but tot bro melvin shld be more concerned abt how to defend the only domestic trophy his team won in the just-concluded season in the next season..

  2. #22

    Default Re: Champions League final

    German media blast Chelsea's Champions League victory over Bayern Munich as a 'farce'

    Germany's media reacted with outrage to Chelsea's Champions League victory against Bayern Munich, describing their feat as "an accident" and "a farce."

    GERMANY
    Christian Spiller, sports editor of Die Zeit, said Chelsea's right to rule Europe was undermined by Bayern's statistical dominance.

    The problem with the victory of Chelsea is not just that they won, but more importantly the way that they won. It was undeserved. More than that, actually it was a farce. [Chelsea] may call themselves the best team in Europe, but this will go down in football history as an accident.

    Bayern Munich were, for all 120 minutes, better than the so-called best team in Europe. A week ago, as some Bayern players acknowledged after the DFB Cup final, their dominance was subjective. Not this time. The statistics list, a paragon of objectivity, reported 35 to nine shots on goal, and 20 to one corners. In no Champions League game this season has Bayern had more shots on goal and more corners than in this final not even the 7-0 win against Basel.

    He added:

    But what's the use complaining? Chelsea had travelled with the aim of having as little as possible to do with the football game. They leaned back in their rocking chairs around the penalty area they're all a little older and waited for the end of the game.


    you can buy better gear but you can't buy a better eye

  3. #23

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    Ah.... He is just a bad loser. You don't score, you don't win. No use talking about statistic..
    Soccer is much more than that. Congrats to Chelsea.

    From a die hard MU fan. 

  4. #24

    Default Re: Champions League final

    Quote Originally Posted by White Wolf View Post
    Ah.... He is just a bad loser. You don't score, you don't win. No use talking about statistic..
    Soccer is much more than that. Congrats to Chelsea.

    From a die hard MU fan. …
    thx bro....if the boot had been on the either foot, i wonder if he would have sung the same tune?
    e.g. Bayern meets Barcelona in the Champions League final played at the Nou Camp, with 4 first team regulars missing from the Bayern lineup. Throughout the match, Bayern set up a brave defensive wall which repulsed wave after wave of Barca attacks, clawed themselves back into the game at the death by the sheer strength and willpower of Bastian Schweinsteiger, and finally won in a penalty shootout (in typical German fashion) with nerves of Bavarian steel.

    you can buy better gear but you can't buy a better eye

  5. #25
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    Default Re: Champions League final

    Bayern lost because they did not have a strategic genius in mid-field. They would have won if they had a young (time-tunnel-transported) Franz Beckenbauer; or a young (time-tunnel-transported) Gnter Netzer in mid-field. Bayern was useless if they "dominated" the match but cannot score.

  6. #26

    Default Re: Champions League final

    Quote Originally Posted by zaren View Post
    But what's the use complaining? Chelsea had travelled with the aim of having as little as possible to do with the football game. They leaned back in their rocking chairs around the penalty area – they're all a little older – and waited for the end of the game.


    Well, to be fair, they're right - I watched the game, Chelsea put a voodoo curse on their goal. They walled against Barca too.
    Alpha

  7. #27

    Default Re: Champions League final

    Quote Originally Posted by Rashkae View Post
    Well, to be fair, they're right - I watched the game, Chelsea put a voodoo curse on their goal. They walled against Barca too.
    This kind of defensive tactic is quite a gamble. Chelsea tried it and got away with it twice, against Barca and then Bayern. So in a way, they rode their luck. But sports is about psychology too, when 'favourites' like Barca and Bayern fail to score as the match progresses, the pressure builds to the underdogs' advantage and I think this manifests itself most obviously during penalty kicks (Messi, Schweinsteger, Robben all missed). So I think Chelsea in the end got their tactics right. So what if Bayern dominated? There is only one statistic that matters, and that's the final score.

    I'm not a Chelsea fan btw, but this was the kind of final even a neutral would find exciting!

  8. #28

    Default Re: Champions League final

    blame it on the players who fail to score with many chances....
    Eat breath LIVERPOOL!!!

  9. #29
    Senior Member melvin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Champions League final

    Quote Originally Posted by zaren View Post
    most likely heading back to spain .... lol
    Heading back there is boring nothing new like very clockwork like hope to go to a new country...btw which country haven got it? or long time no got it?

  10. #30
    Senior Member melvin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Champions League final

    Quote Originally Posted by kuanwk View Post
    would expect a few more big spenders fr the other leagues to be in contention..
    but tot bro melvin shld be more concerned abt how to defend the only domestic trophy his team won in the just-concluded season in the next season..
    Hahaha... that one is up for lelong...

  11. #31
    Senior Member melvin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Champions League final

    Quote Originally Posted by zaren View Post
    German media blast Chelsea's Champions League victory over Bayern Munich as a 'farce'

    Germany's media reacted with outrage to Chelsea's Champions League victory against Bayern Munich, describing their feat as "an accident" and "a farce."

    GERMANY
    Christian Spiller, sports editor of Die Zeit, said Chelsea's right to rule Europe was undermined by Bayern's statistical dominance.

    The problem with the victory of Chelsea is not just that they won, but more importantly the way that they won. It was undeserved. More than that, actually – it was a farce. [Chelsea] may call themselves the best team in Europe, but this will go down in football history as an accident.

    Bayern Munich were, for all 120 minutes, better than the so-called best team in Europe. A week ago, as some Bayern players acknowledged after the DFB Cup final, their dominance was subjective. Not this time. The statistics list, a paragon of objectivity, reported 35 to nine shots on goal, and 20 to one corners. In no Champions League game this season has Bayern had more shots on goal and more corners than in this final – not even the 7-0 win against Basel.

    He added:

    But what's the use complaining? Chelsea had travelled with the aim of having as little as possible to do with the football game. They leaned back in their rocking chairs around the penalty area – they're all a little older – and waited for the end of the game.




    LOL... dun they know that football is all about placing the ball into the net and defending that goal, be it regardless of possession of attempts at goal!

  12. #32
    Senior Member melvin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Champions League final

    Quote Originally Posted by zaren View Post
    thx bro....if the boot had been on the either foot, i wonder if he would have sung the same tune?
    e.g. Bayern meets Barcelona in the Champions League final played at the Nou Camp, with 4 first team regulars missing from the Bayern lineup. Throughout the match, Bayern set up a brave defensive wall which repulsed wave after wave of Barca attacks, clawed themselves back into the game at the death by the sheer strength and willpower of Bastian Schweinsteiger, and finally won in a penalty shootout (in typical German fashion) with nerves of Bavarian steel.

    They are just repeat what they have done to barca ma.... lol

  13. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by melvin

    Finally the "King of Cups" finally got the cup they have been missing! lol... Remember to hold on tight for next season hmmm... will it be at stamford bridge or will it be coming back to OT!
    Haiz sounds like a sour devil....next time learn to protect lead better, 8 points also can lose

  14. #34
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    Default Re: Champions League final

    I think the results and statistics speak for themselves. Its without a doubt a one sided affair except for the equaliser and then the missed penalty in extra time. You may call it fated to lose for BM or fated to win by Chelsea. A WIN IS A WIN, whether how the winning side did it, it not so important.

    However, I hope these situations do not manifest themselves into a norm in the coming EURO 2012 and Olympics football games. It would be be a disaster for football if all teams (country and even at club levels cup finals), especially those who deemed themselves as underdogs, adopt the same approach and play for penalties shootouts. How can we make football a more exciting game to watch with both sides playing to score and win!!! This debate has always been there and will probably be so going forward. No solution, LIVE WITH IT!!!!

  15. #35

    Default Re: Champions League final

    Leander Schaerlaeckens: Chelsea pragmatic approach may be the way forward
    It may not be the most attractive brand of soccer, but sometimes that doesn't matter.

    May 21, 2012 12:28:00 PM By Leander Schaerlaeckens

    Every few years, the pendulum swings again, shifting momentum between two ideological schools of soccer that have been at odds for many decades – the proactive and the pragmatic.

    On Saturday, one such shift seems to have occurred during the UEFA Champions League final.

    There are those who feel soccer is a game of beauty – The Beautiful Game, even – and that its players are beholden to its most honorable pursuits of possession and goals, which will consequently lead to winning. Others say it is a sport, and that the objective of sport and competition is to compete and win – period. How the win is achieved is of little consequence.

    Being Dutch, I’ve always felt strongly that professional footballers are entertainers first and foremost. Cease to entertain and the public will lose interest, causing the entire industry to come crashing down, no matter how much you’re winning. (Others would argue that winning is entertaining.) Hence my disdain for teams seeking nothing more from a game than three points or passage into a next round, motive tarnishing method.

    Chelsea is one such team employing those dastardly defensive tactics. The Blues tried not to be.

    At the beginning of the season new manager Andre Villas-Boas hoped to instill an optimistic, free-flowing style. He was out of a job by March. His assistant, Roberto Di Matteo, was made interim manager and immediately did the opposite, reverting to a defense-for-all and all-for-defense approach. Improbably, Chelsea rode it to Champions League wins over the high-octane offenses of Napoli and Benfica and, critically, Barcelona in the semifinals and Bayern Munich in Saturday’s final – the two teams pointed to as the trendsetters in the resurgence of attractive, attacking football of the last few years. Production conquered process.

    There was an exact moment when that pendulum seemed to hurtle back to the other extremity, gliding from aesthetics-soccer to results-soccer. Bayern had taken the game to Chelsea all night long. Bayern, after all, was the very embodiment of the game’s shift back to attacking soccer. After decades of fielding laboring, rough-hewn teams that specialized in eking out 1-0 results, Bayern turned into one of the most powerful attacking machines in the world in recent years, with the game’s most dazzling wingers – Arjen Robben and Franck Ribery – and pin-point precise playmakers, Bastian Schweinsteiger and Toni Kroos.

    For 80 minutes Bayern had pounded on Chelsea’s barricaded door until Thomas Mueller finally nodded in the go-ahead goal in the 83rd. And then the Bavarians turned negative. Almost immediately Jupp Heynckes took Mueller out for Daniel van Buyten, a swap that gave Bayern a third central midfielder to reinforce its back line.

    And it was that opening that allowed Chelsea into the game for the first time all night. Thoroughly dominated until then, Chelsea now had its opening to venture forward, the space to undertake some attacking of its own and capitalize on all that conserved energy – exactly the chance it hoped to get late in the game on the back of all that defending. Bayern rewarded Chelsea for its cynicism. Rather than keep up the pressure that had allowed it hold the Londoners down all night, Bayern caved.

    Just a minute after Mueller came off, Chelsea ventured out and won its only corner of the game. It found the superb Didier Drogba, who in turn found the back of the net with a sublime header. No longer on the back foot, Chelsea tried to attack throughout the 30 minutes of extra time and would win on penalties, all of it enabled by Bayern’s defying its own philosophy, which had brought it to within two minutes and some added time of the European crown.

    Chelsea’s negativity won it the highest honor in club soccer. Others will take note, the same way they did when Barcelona tore the continent up for three seasons doing the opposite. Saturday’s result was a victory for what can only be described as a modern variant of Catenaccio – those old Italian lockdown tactics. If the rest of the game follows suit and reverts to cynicism, we’re in for some mirthless years. Until, inevitably, the pendulum zips back to the bright side.
    you can buy better gear but you can't buy a better eye

  16. #36
    Senior Member roDz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zaren
    Leander Schaerlaeckens: Chelsea pragmatic approach may be the way forward
    It may not be the most attractive brand of soccer, but sometimes that doesn't matter.
    May 21, 2012 12:28:00 PM By Leander Schaerlaeckens

    Every few years, the pendulum swings again, shifting momentum between two ideological schools of soccer that have been at odds for many decades – the proactive and the pragmatic.

    On Saturday, one such shift seems to have occurred during the UEFA Champions League final.

    There are those who feel soccer is a game of beauty – The Beautiful Game, even – and that its players are beholden to its most honorable pursuits of possession and goals, which will consequently lead to winning. Others say it is a sport, and that the objective of sport and competition is to compete and win – period. How the win is achieved is of little consequence.

    Being Dutch, I’ve always felt strongly that professional footballers are entertainers first and foremost. Cease to entertain and the public will lose interest, causing the entire industry to come crashing down, no matter how much you’re winning. (Others would argue that winning is entertaining.) Hence my disdain for teams seeking nothing more from a game than three points or passage into a next round, motive tarnishing method.

    Chelsea is one such team employing those dastardly defensive tactics. The Blues tried not to be.

    At the beginning of the season new manager Andre Villas-Boas hoped to instill an optimistic, free-flowing style. He was out of a job by March. His assistant, Roberto Di Matteo, was made interim manager and immediately did the opposite, reverting to a defense-for-all and all-for-defense approach. Improbably, Chelsea rode it to Champions League wins over the high-octane offenses of Napoli and Benfica and, critically, Barcelona in the semifinals and Bayern Munich in Saturday’s final – the two teams pointed to as the trendsetters in the resurgence of attractive, attacking football of the last few years. Production conquered process.

    There was an exact moment when that pendulum seemed to hurtle back to the other extremity, gliding from aesthetics-soccer to results-soccer. Bayern had taken the game to Chelsea all night long. Bayern, after all, was the very embodiment of the game’s shift back to attacking soccer. After decades of fielding laboring, rough-hewn teams that specialized in eking out 1-0 results, Bayern turned into one of the most powerful attacking machines in the world in recent years, with the game’s most dazzling wingers – Arjen Robben and Franck Ribery – and pin-point precise playmakers, Bastian Schweinsteiger and Toni Kroos.

    For 80 minutes Bayern had pounded on Chelsea’s barricaded door until Thomas Mueller finally nodded in the go-ahead goal in the 83rd. And then the Bavarians turned negative. Almost immediately Jupp Heynckes took Mueller out for Daniel van Buyten, a swap that gave Bayern a third central midfielder to reinforce its back line.

    And it was that opening that allowed Chelsea into the game for the first time all night. Thoroughly dominated until then, Chelsea now had its opening to venture forward, the space to undertake some attacking of its own and capitalize on all that conserved energy – exactly the chance it hoped to get late in the game on the back of all that defending. Bayern rewarded Chelsea for its cynicism. Rather than keep up the pressure that had allowed it hold the Londoners down all night, Bayern caved.

    Just a minute after Mueller came off, Chelsea ventured out and won its only corner of the game. It found the superb Didier Drogba, who in turn found the back of the net with a sublime header. No longer on the back foot, Chelsea tried to attack throughout the 30 minutes of extra time and would win on penalties, all of it enabled by Bayern’s defying its own philosophy, which had brought it to within two minutes and some added time of the European crown.

    Chelsea’s negativity won it the highest honor in club soccer. Others will take note, the same way they did when Barcelona tore the continent up for three seasons doing the opposite. Saturday’s result was a victory for what can only be described as a modern variant of Catenaccio – those old Italian lockdown tactics. If the rest of the game follows suit and reverts to cynicism, we’re in for some mirthless years. Until, inevitably, the pendulum zips back to the bright side.
    Chelsea, under RdM, an Italian, have mastered the Italian art of football. Very strong in defence, defend like there is no tomorrow but making sure every attack counts..deserved the win..no doubt..only sore losers think otherwise..haha..

  17. #37
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    Default Re: Champions League final

    Quote Originally Posted by esoeij View Post
    (Messi, Schweinsteger, Robben all missed).
    No wonder lose. Robben is a dirty player. Commits vicious fouls against others. See the last World Cup matches. No strategic vision.

  18. #38

    Default Re: Champions League final

    Quote Originally Posted by ricohflex View Post
    No wonder lose. Robben is a dirty player. Commits vicious fouls against others. See the last World Cup matches. No strategic vision.
    Heh, he is a pussycat compared to some of his (national team) teammate(s). Remember this?


  19. #39
    Senior Member melvin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Champions League final

    Quote Originally Posted by pachero View Post
    Haiz sounds like a sour devil....next time learn to protect lead better, 8 points also can lose
    lol... really sounds like ar? hahaha.... we did not lose the 8point lead we throw them away!
    Last edited by melvin; 22nd May 2012 at 10:30 PM.

  20. #40
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    Default Re: Champions League final

    Quote Originally Posted by esoeij View Post
    Heh, he is a pussycat compared to some of his (national team) teammate(s). Remember this?
    Howard Webb the English referee got no courage. He was over-awed by the atmosphere of the world cup final. In other words he was useless in the match.
    A strict no nonsense referee would have red carded De Jong on the spot. But timid Howard Webb dared not. His worthlessness as a referee led to gangsterism on the football field during the rest of the match, mostly committed by the Dutch players.

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