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Thread: I need help with wide angle converters...

  1. #21
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: I need help with wide angle converters...

    Quote Originally Posted by melthazor View Post
    If I'm gonna pay 200-300 odd just to rent the lens, I might as well buy the lens as one of you mentioned. Which is exactly what I thought as well.
    My only concern is buying second hand, what should I look out for? Any help, pointers or tips?
    We have these sticky threads, nearly everywhere: http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/newbi...nd-lenses.html
    EOS

  2. #22

    Default Re: I need help with wide angle converters...

    Quote Originally Posted by ZerocoolAstra View Post
    2) Open both front and rear caps, press down the aperture lever and look through.
    For Canon lenses, there's no need to do that, there's no lever in the first place. The aperture is electrically controlled from the contacts between the lens and the body, rather than mechanically controlled with a lever.

    What Sinned79 and Zerocool Astra (apart from the first part of point 2) have said are correct, and please read the sticky thread Octarine linked you to, but I'd like to add on some stuff not covered too:

    When looking through a lens with a torchlight, don't place the torch such that you can see it. The idea is to use the light from the torch to illuminate the lens elements, so if you get "blinded" by your torch (I use a very strong one), then you're doing it wrong.

    Before you go out to buy (or anytime from now till then), dismount your current lens from the body, and look through it with a torch as though you're going to buy that lens that you are currently holding. Look at how it's supposed to look like when you shine your torch through it. Conduct any or all of these tests that we've listed here to your current lens. That should at least give you an idea what to expect. (do note that if you're buying a 10-22, it's a USM lens, that means it's build quality will be one grade higher than your current lens. So if you're finding that it's worse, immediately reject it.)

    Also, check the zoom and focus rings to be sure you like them first. Some are looser, some are tighter. As long as they don't move on their own (like zoom creeping), it's fine. But people have different preferences on how tight/loose they like the rings to be.

    To check for zoom creep (if you're not buying prime lenses), just put the lens to the widest angle (e.g. 18-55, set it to 18. 10-22, set it to 10), and then face the lens downwards. Jiggle it lightly, and if the zoom doesn't change, try setting it to the longest (e.g. 18-55, set to 55. 10-22 set to 22), and then face it upwards. Jiggle it once more, and if it doesn't change, the zoom is fine.

    For lenses which extend when zooming, like the 18-55, the 18-135, the 18-200 etc. extend out to longest, and then jiggle the "extended portion". It shouldn't be too loose. You can check with your current 18-55 to know what's the normal amount of leeway to give. (10-22 doesn't extend externally when zooming, so this test is not possible with the 10-22)

    When doing test shots, use "spot auto focus" instead of just "normal auto focus" (if you don't know what that means, try to google it or read your manual). Then make sure you select the center AF point, and shoot a prominent detailed object. A newspaper is great, a starbucks coffee cup is great (especially if it's cold and has condensation on it), a plant maybe a little difficult, so try to avoid that. Then on your camera, check that the image is sharp exactly where you focus on.

    Specifically for the 10-22, it's a USM lens (this point also applies to all other USM lenses), so when focusing, it should be near-silent, or completely silent when compared to your current 18-55.

    If, you plan on buying a lens (in the future, like the 17-55 IS USM) with Image-Stabilising (IS) technology, then make sure it's working as well. With your shutter half-pressed, put your ear to the base of your lens to listen for any sound. If there is, the IS is working. Then test at a few different low shutter speeds to see if it makes a difference. You should be able to find a speed that the difference between "with IS" and "without IS" is noticable. If you can't, then the IS is not working properly, or you're not doing this test right (needs some experience)
    Also do note that Image Stabilising technology is called such only by Canon. Nikon uses the term Vibration Reduction (VR). Tamron, Sigma, and Tokina have their own terms too, but they all are essentially the same thing.

  3. #23
    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
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    Default Re: I need help with wide angle converters...

    Quote Originally Posted by Wizongod View Post
    For Canon lenses, there's no need to do that, there's no lever in the first place. The aperture is electrically controlled from the contacts between the lens and the body, rather than mechanically controlled with a lever.
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    haha! Caught! yes yes you are right
    Exploring! :)

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