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Thread: Going to Acheh/Sri Lanka.

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by popeye
    This is a very short minded thinking
    Wait till disaster struct your family and see what you feel when people doing nothing but asking "how can we help ? In what way ? "

    There's always things you can do there!!!

    Distributing supplies, burrying dead bodies, serving food to the patients, consoling the victims, etc etc

    I myself have been sending out emails to organizing parties if they need volunteer. Hopefully can depart soon.
    Whoa....chill. As many folk here have pointed out, unless you have a specific objective and some knowledge/skill for this type of work, you could easily end up being a hindrance, or worse, a statistic.

    Cheers,

  2. #22
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    Do consider very seriously before making up your mind. Like the others have said, there are many important things to take care of. Most important is vaccination. Then you need to settle medical care. You'll want to get anti-malaria pills etc..
    Most of these places don't have power, you aren't going to be bringing a generator so consider how you'll get around to doing things at night.
    Even communications can be a problem. Don't expect your cellphone to work nor any working telephones available.
    I've volunteered for my unit to go in the next wave (probably to Andaman Islands) to help out. We're better settled than the average joe since our immunisation and anti-malaria pills etc will be settled. We also have our own power generators and vehicles (in addition to the heavy machinery we'll be using to build shelters and move debris). We also have our peacekeeping engineers who can (given time) build shelters for us but you may have to rely on just a small tent.
    The first wave is leaving for Aceh and even then, the situation there isn't very friendly. There are TNI soldiers and our own forces to help with our security. But if you go there, who's going to protect you?

    So do consider before you decide to go and help out. Your expenses can also escalate. Buying a good torchlight and batteries, female essentials, charcoal pills + misc. medication, disposable underwear, foodstuff, cooking accessories (bunsen burner or solid fuel) etc.. And there's safety concerns, your well-being (who'll provide medical aid), shelter, communications... You should seriously discuss with your family before making up your mind.

  3. #23

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    Waah...... I just went out for a gathering and now to see all kinds of responses coming in!!!

    Many thanks to those who have voiced out their advice and opinions and will appreciate more comments coming in as it always pay to have more heads than one.

    Cheerios!
    -Michelle-

  4. #24
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    Prepare yourself mentally that it is going to be 10 times, 100 times worst than anything you saw on TV.

    I was at Musi River on the 2nd day after the SilkAir crash. Though 'no chance' to see 'anything' bad, the whole place: people, families, atmosphere, all made me very depressed. After the 1st week, I called office for replacment.

    This time round, I also did considered going somewhere. I know others will say you can offer your help here. BUt the fact is, help at the frontline and hel***g behind the scene is two very different thing. You need to be there to understand the feeling.

    If you know of any org needs volunteers, do PM me.

  5. #25

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    There are other ways to help locally. Helping the various organisations pack items for the disaster areas, for example.

    As others have said, if you're not part of an int'l relief organisation, I would caution you against going. You might just become an extra mouth to feed (or worse become ill and require medicine yourself), when food and any other supplies are at a shortage right now.

  6. #26
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    hello all,

    just fyi, watched the news last nite, they mentioned that they had received too many clothes donated by public, and currently the most important helps they need from public is money, cos with these money they can plan what to buy for the countries affected...

  7. #27
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    how about tze chi? did anyone contact them? understand they help people a lot in various part of the world, in fact they are one of the first team to arrive sir lanka (if i'm not wrong)

  8. #28
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    Default "Unless...an organised team with logistics...don't go"

    From the below link -->

    http://www.menafn.com/qn_news_story....wKTDM9SDw50zwu

    "Yet, the Red Cross is unwilling to send any volunteers at this stage. "Sending volunteers at this stage is more of a hindrance than a help. Very often they can't get to the place. Unless you're a local army, an organized team that can bring its own logistics and doesn't have to rely on resources on the ground, our advice is 'don't go," Chen says."

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkw
    From the below link -->

    http://www.menafn.com/qn_news_story....wKTDM9SDw50zwu

    "Yet, the Red Cross is unwilling to send any volunteers at this stage. "Sending volunteers at this stage is more of a hindrance than a help. Very often they can't get to the place. Unless you're a local army, an organized team that can bring its own logistics and doesn't have to rely on resources on the ground, our advice is 'don't go," Chen says."
    Hi michelle, from the link..I think the best help is $.
    May be u should consider to donate the money that u had prepared for the purchase of the air ticket.

  10. #30

    Default Some basic requirements to be successful

    Hi Mich, I have some experience in disaster mitigation. Some pointers to share if you are deciding to go :

    1. Mental strength is very important. If you still 'deciding' at this point, chances are that you are not well prepared. Vaccination, equipment and training are important as well.
    2. Wong se is right. Go in a well organsied group. Pre-requisite. Period.
    3. You must be physicaly fit. eg. Can tahan 4 hours sleep and 12 hours work continuously.
    4. If you are a women, I advise strongly go with a group with some women. Otherwise you may not be able to last 10 days without mutual support. There are things you will find difficult to share with males. Communication is very important to 'let go' of the things you are going to experience, see and handle.
    5. Go in a group with a medical doctor on board. And keep a good hygiene standard.
    6. Do not go for more than 3 weeks.
    7. Be prepared to sleep on the floor, in the open, eat poor quality food, function as a co-hesive group.
    8. Be emotionally prepared to ward off all kinds of demands from the ground and focus on what you can do.
    9. Keep a tight lip of what you see and do not add to the problems of the country in need.
    10. Be there to serve, look after your own safety and not to be recognised one bit at the end. No heros/heroine needed in such situations.

    In the worse case scenario, be prepared to 'Go' with no qualms.
    I wish you all the best.
    Last edited by tOGGY; 31st December 2004 at 02:08 PM.

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