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Thread: Why Slides?

  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by espn
    CKiang, Yeah, hehehe cheapo method, in office and at home, my office monitor can go up to 140 luminance, good enough to view though. At home also very good, but like I said, it's an el-cheapo that works, but also afraid to dirty the screen. Hehe.

    bff: 1) Provia 100F i nvr used before, I've done VS on humans, colours are ok, mostly I do Astia on humans

    2) Comparable if you don't argue on details and gamut range, else slides will definitely win anytime, hands down.

    3) Yes I shoot astia for my models mainly, good skin colours and not so saturated colours on the overall.

    espn , whoa that was a fast reply! Does cathay sell bulk roll for ASTIA?
    by the way, what are the bulk roll slides available in SG?

  2. #42
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    Cathay has a pack of 6 astia at 49 IIRC. Per roll is $9 IIRC. I have bought a pack of 6 and kept in my fridge.

    I think for bulk roll slides need to order in the cans, I'm still relatively new to shooting slides, so I can't comment much sorry

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by eagles_creek
    Do you guys normally print from slides directly or print from it's scanned image?

    How much would a roll of Velvia 100F cost? Best place to get ?

    Thanks.
    Hmmm the few times I print, I just dropped the slide off at the shop, ask for print. I did a 8R print of provia vs a 8S print from 120 provia film once for experimentation.

    I think 100F costs 10.50 at least? Or more? It's a bloody expensive film, more ex than RVP 50!

    Alvin

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by alvin
    I think 100F costs 10.50 at least? Or more? It's a bloody expensive film, more ex than RVP 50!

    Alvin
    Yeah, a super-duper expensive slide!
    Cost is the only reason why I've kept off from shooting slides. Even the cheap slides work out to be around $6 per roll--twice as expensive as my regular working Superia 400.

  5. #45
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    Ah Pao, yeah it's bloody ex. What can I do, I'm hooked onto old, dying, uesless, decrepit technology I can't wait to get a 100 foot can of 100F mate. I really like this film - skin tones are very very good, in my noob opinion. And the vividness, as yet, I can't tell the diff between RVP 100F and RVP. Plus, one stop gain in speed. Geez I'm in heaven man. Though I must say comparing Sensia II 100 VS rvp 100F, the 100F's over saturation may tend to draw attention away from human subjects... Sensia II 100 seems to be better in this aspect, and seems to be very fine grained for a "consumer" film, and the colours seem rather accurate.

    Negs... need to print to see, plus, one roll of slides, for me, I rarely have more then 2 or 3 keepers - and previously when I started out shooting, all 36 are crap lol. Still, my prefered way of viewing pictures are slide + lightbox + loupe :-)

    But nothing beats the price of negs man, I think there was a time I could get 3 rolls of Superia 400 for $11? Or was it 4 rolls? Long time never shoot at weddings liao... (but remember films like Reala 100 also costs alot...) And for grain in 4R sized prints, I feel that negatives have the edge with high speed film. I used to use Sensia II 400 alot, and the grain on prints was a bit objectionable, personally. Kinda like Press/Superia 800, but without the colour punch.

  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by alvin
    can't wait to get a 100 foot can of 100F mate. I really like this film - skin tones are very very good, in my noob opinion. And the vividness, as yet, I can't tell the diff between RVP 100F and RVP. Plus, one stop gain in speed. Geez I'm in heaven man.
    looks like you got your wish after the kopi session ....

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigfatfish
    looks like you got your wish after the kopi session ....
    <G> .

  8. #48
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    I bought a pack of 10 rolls of Provia 100F at $47.00 from Ruby... Its actually $4.70!
    The equipment can only bring you so far - the rest of the photographic journey is done by you.

  9. #49

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    SO CHEAP?!
    expired?

  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigfatfish
    SO CHEAP?!
    expired?
    Haha... Nope! Just went to check all eight rolls (Used 2 yesterday)... The expiry year is 2006!

    Wait, I'm talking about 120 film, so dunno about 35mm...
    The equipment can only bring you so far - the rest of the photographic journey is done by you.

  11. #51
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    Hi all,

    I have some questions regarding metering for slides. Hope can get some advise......

    As mentioned earlier in this thread, slides have narrower exposure latitude.

    Henceforth, metering must be pretty accurate.

    May I ask then how do you guys normally meter when shooting slides?

    Do you meter for the shadows the way you do in B&W photography using spotmetering and stop down 2 stops?
    In other words, can the zone system be applied when shooting slides?

    I've came across readings on the Chromazone System which adopts a 5 zones system as compared to the 10 zones system by Ansel Adams. The reasons for having 5 instead of 10 zones is due to the limited tonal range of slides, or rather, color photography.

    Does anybody here practice this Chromazone System? Would you like to share your thoughts and why you adopted this system? How well has it work for you?

    While I am not looking for some system to adopt, I am very interested in knowing how is metering in slides shooting normally done?

    Using Matrix and just fire away?

    Is it really better to under-expose slides by half stop to obtain richer colors?

    Or is it really better to expose normally if you would need to print your slides since printing actually "automatically" reduces your exposure by half stop?

    Of course, there might be different schools of thoughts, but it would be great to hear from you guys !!!

    Your advises are greatly appreciated.....

  12. #52

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    just to share. I am quite new to slides too , but so far i had satisfactory results with metering for highlights. I use centre weighted metering. And for 100F Velvia i shoot at 125ASA. I think that counts as 1/3 underexposed for saturation.
    maybe you can try out a roll and find out if the matrix metering gives you the result u want?

  13. #53
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    May I ask then how do you guys normally meter when shooting slides?

    Do you meter for the shadows the way you do in B&W photography using spotmetering and stop down 2 stops?
    In other words, can the zone system be applied when shooting slides?
    My experience is, if I use a spot meter this way, the highlights will get blown. If I do it the reverse way, yes, it works. These are some of the ways I've tried exposing my slides:

    a) For totally no battery usage, I use this guide:
    Ultimate Exposure Computer

    I've used it for about year+ with my Minolta 7S. Pretty good. You can "feel" how much light after a while when using this.

    b) S$80.00 panagor light meter, reflected/incident metering
    Incident metering seems excellent, just troublesome to use.

    c) Multi metering with Dynax 5 slr
    Erm, near perfect? Limited experience, mostly with Sensia II 100. Gets what I want to expose for. It WILL overexpose skies to expose its supposed subject correctly. I think you'll need to learn how the matrix meter works for this...

    d) Minolta Spot Meter III
    Spot for the highlights of the desired subject, then press the "highlight button" (DUH!) and it gives an exposure. Works pretty good. But better used for evaluating the EV of various parts of the scene. Once u know the EV range, decide how to expose, whether to give up the highlights or shadows.

    e) Centre Weighted meter
    I think this has to be the easiest to use. Just point the camera at the object you wanna expose for, AE-Lock, recompose, focus and fire. Just need to find out the proper ISO rating for the meter (e.g. my G1 needs to have the meter @ 64 for velvia 50).

    Is it really better to under-expose slides by half stop to obtain richer colors?
    Haven't purposely done this, but an underexposed slide, when put through a film scanner seems to be able to save alot of the detail. Overexposed, detail is blown.

    http://gallery.photo.net/photo/2724946-lg.jpg

    In the actual slide, the cat is totally like a pitch black rock. After some level adjustments, it can be seen clearly. Observe, that I am clearly hopeless with PS!

    http://gallery.photo.net/photo/2805453-md.jpg

    Another one, underexposed, but still can be saved. I won't say the colour is "saturated" on the actual slide, but rather, "murky"...

    Sharing my experiences, feel free to correct 'em.

    Alvin

  14. #54

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    Haha, I'll just put myself in Evaluative mode (Canon user here) and fire away. P mode somemore! Most of the time it does OK, at least in outdoors.

    I'm a dummy when it comes to metering; I'll let the camera do all the work.

    Here's a sample taken with Fujifilm Sensia 100; can't remember the exposure settings, but it should be smaller than f/3.5 and longer than 1s. This slide was scanned in with a commercial drum scanner (got an opportunity) so the quality is pretty good.
    Last edited by Ah Pao; 30th December 2004 at 01:53 AM. Reason: Added sample slide photo

  15. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by eagles_creek
    Hi all,

    I have some questions regarding metering for slides. Hope can get some advise......

    As mentioned earlier in this thread, slides have narrower exposure latitude.

    Henceforth, metering must be pretty accurate.

    May I ask then how do you guys normally meter when shooting slides?

    Do you meter for the shadows the way you do in B&W photography using spotmetering and stop down 2 stops?
    In other words, can the zone system be applied when shooting slides?

    I've came across readings on the Chromazone System which adopts a 5 zones system as compared to the 10 zones system by Ansel Adams. The reasons for having 5 instead of 10 zones is due to the limited tonal range of slides, or rather, color photography.

    Does anybody here practice this Chromazone System? Would you like to share your thoughts and why you adopted this system? How well has it work for you?

    While I am not looking for some system to adopt, I am very interested in knowing how is metering in slides shooting normally done?

    Using Matrix and just fire away?

    Is it really better to under-expose slides by half stop to obtain richer colors?

    Or is it really better to expose normally if you would need to print your slides since printing actually "automatically" reduces your exposure by half stop?

    Of course, there might be different schools of thoughts, but it would be great to hear from you guys !!!

    Your advises are greatly appreciated.....
    for B&W we meter for the shadow,coz we can print for the hightlights later one(burning)
    for slides if u do the same,ur highlights will be blown off,nothing to burn..

    i usually expose at zone 5 for slides,and for night scenes,i do it at zone 6 adding more exposure which i find it better..

    IMO,minus 1/3 stop looks better becoz of projection either by projector or lightbox as they increase the ilumination of the slides.

    a normally exposed slides might appear abit over when projected..

    Matrix metering works 95% of the time for me



  16. #56
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    Thanks guys for your inputs....

    Pretty interesting methods of metering we have here, certainly triggers off a few ways which I could try and see what works best for me.

    You're probably right about exposing for the highlights Alvin & Kex. It seems that in this aspect, it's opposite from film.

    I like that exposure computer and adjustment of camera's ISO rating.

    I think to get that more accurate adjustment of ISO rating, you would need to fire a few shots at different ISO settings and see which one is more accurate?

    Glad to know that matrix / evaluative metering works most of the time too...

    Kind of makes me feel better.....

  17. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by kex
    i usually expose at zone 5 for slides,and for night scenes,i do it at zone 6 adding more exposure which i find it better..
    Hi Kex,

    when you mentioned you usually expose at zone 5 for slides, that means you usually metered off a middle gray as in the same in b/w photography?

  18. #58
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    Brings back memories. Was going through my store room and realised that I have a projector about 15 years ago collecting dust. Ahh.. yes slide, once you look at it with a lupe you will not forget how the picture pops out in almost a 3D effect. My suggesting is get a projector if you are really serious but remember the projector is only half of what is needed, you need to get a good screen as well.
    As for exposure not sure about new films now I have given it up after thousands of Kodachrome 25 and 64. The only thing I know is you need to be spot on in exposure, maybe current camera metering is good enough but I used to do slides with only handheld meter. Once exposure is spot on you will not regret it.
    BTW do they still do Cibachrome prints or similar now ?.

  19. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis
    BTW do they still do Cibachrome prints or similar now ?.
    Think Cibachrome is history long time ago liao, other direct print yes but not sure what's the name.

  20. #60
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    Oh so mountain tortoise, so it died along with Kodachrome I presume.


    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights
    Think Cibachrome is history long time ago liao, other direct print yes but not sure what's the name.

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