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Thread: Why Slides?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by popeye
    why slides?

    why not!?
    The shiok factor is there when looking at slides on a lightbox....
    The equipment can only bring you so far - the rest of the photographic journey is done by you.

  2. #22

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    Thanks Guys,
    I'll buy some to try out myself too. Would have to buy a loupe but custom make a lightbox, they seem so expensive ... for a lamp


    I really envy you guys in Singapore, I've asked around for some Kodak HIE film for B&W but can find none. I might have to go to the larger stores for the slides and they're much more expensive.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by popeye
    why slides?

    why not!?
    Popeye, I'm just trying to make the title short. Think it's easier to read than "Why do you prefer slides?" or "Please help me out.....". I just can't think of a good title for it.

    Was curious, ask a bit first before trying cos its quite ex, >RM$18 per roll.

  4. #24
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    btw, what camera system are you using? More importantly, what kind of metering does it use? With slides on my minolta Dynax 5's 14 segment metering, it is just perfect, no need for any exposure compensation/ae lock in broad daylight, or even at night for long exposures.

    OTOH, with my G1 or X700 (both use centre weighted, i believe), not only do I need to rate my film at a different EI, I frequently need to use the AE lock to ensure the metering system locks onto what I want it to meter, they just love to expose for the sky ;-)

    Finally, be careful if you shoot in artificial light or the shade. Slide film records the colour temp (hope I'm explaining it correctly) exactly as it is, and not as we see it. So under like my home lights, my living room is a nasty green. Velvia 50 + people + tungsten = orange brown people haha :-) Use a flash to avoid this, or some CC filters.

    Try out a roll, make sure it's E6 processed. Have fun!

    Alvin

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by T.A.
    Thanks Guys,
    I'll buy some to try out myself too. Would have to buy a loupe but custom make a lightbox, they seem so expensive ... for a lamp


    I really envy you guys in Singapore, I've asked around for some Kodak HIE film for B&W but can find none. I might have to go to the larger stores for the slides and they're much more expensive.
    It's not just a light. A good light box has a colour calibrated light which is very neutral and has the correct brightness (so you know if your slides are under/over exposed). It also has a very even illumination throughout the viewing surface compared to most cheap/DIY ones.

    Regards
    CK

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckiang
    It's not just a light. A good light box has a colour calibrated light which is very neutral and has the correct brightness (so you know if your slides are under/over exposed). It also has a very even illumination throughout the viewing surface compared to most cheap/DIY ones.

    Regards
    CK
    So how much is the cheapest good one?
    The equipment can only bring you so far - the rest of the photographic journey is done by you.

  7. #27
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    i'm very happy with a normal lightbox,the slight diff in color temperature i just not worth the $$.can buy alot of slides with the diff.

    if u buy a color corrected light box,u can visualise the effect of filters by placing the filters on top of the slides with more accuracy.like how it looks with a warm filter or PL

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by ckiang
    It's not just a light. A good light box has a colour calibrated light which is very neutral and has the correct brightness (so you know if your slides are under/over exposed). It also has a very even illumination throughout the viewing surface compared to most cheap/DIY ones.

    Regards
    CK
    Me el-cheapo. I open an IE window, full screen it (F11) hang my slides there and view off a loupe. Since my LCD's calibrated the light should be accurate at white... heehee

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by alvin
    Slide film records the colour temp (hope I'm explaining it correctly) exactly as it is, and not as we see it. So under like my home lights, my living room is a nasty green. Velvia 50 + people + tungsten = orange brown people haha :-) Use a flash to avoid this, or some CC filters.
    Same for negative too, but the color corrected during print making, that's why a lots of pple not aware of it.
    Last edited by catchlights; 25th December 2004 at 03:59 PM.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by T.A.
    I'll buy some to try out myself too. Would have to buy a loupe but custom make a lightbox, they seem so expensive ... for a lamp
    Light box is not that expensive lah. I think I bought mine, a A5 size cheap portable plastic one for around A$30. It could use batteries or electricity with a transformer.

    There is few things in life that beats the pleasure of looking at a well-taken slide. The contrast and the saturation are just heavenly.

    However Shooting slides these days is an expensive hobby with the costs of slide films, processing, slide sleeves and holders. And you have to get an expensive film scanner to scan it if you want decent digital files.

  11. #31

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    the colour gamut of transparency film is different from a paper print, plus also consider that the grain structure of slide film is much less obvious than neg film, you'll be thankful for that if you scan your film to print digitally
    I caught an exhibition of some guy who made 24x36 inch sized prints from 35mm slides
    and the grain was barely visible!

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickmak
    So how much is the cheapest good one?
    Can't remember. I have not shot film (slides included) for almost 2 years. If I remember correctly, there was a CP offer for around $190 for a Cabin 4x5" Lightpanel + Rodenstock 4x loupe which is a very, very good deal at that time. Not sure if this combo is still available.

    You should be able to get a good A5 size one for $100 or less, 4x5" for a little lesser.

    Regards
    CK

  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by espn
    Me el-cheapo. I open an IE window, full screen it (F11) hang my slides there and view off a loupe. Since my LCD's calibrated the light should be accurate at white... heehee
    haha, on a 910T? I used to use the monitor as well, when I don't have access to a lightbox (e.g. in office) but I find that its not bright enough. LCDs are brighter, so maybe it might work better, esp. so if it's calibrated. Not as "user friendly" as a lightbox on a table tho, and LCDs are rather fragile.

    Regards
    CK

  14. #34
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    The lightbox in the picture I posted cost me S$50 (or less), can't remember. It can fit up to six 35mm mounted slides. Battery powered for portability, and comes with an AC adaptor for tethered use.

    Check with the MF/Tripod/Film section at CP peninsula. Uncertain if it's calibrated or not, but it looks/feels "white", and definitely not the yellowish glow of my slide viewer! Compact, and carry-able.

    Alvin

  15. #35

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    In response to why slide films are more expensive, I do believe it's an economy of scale problem.

    B&W films used to be relatively cheaper than colour film long, long time ago, but just look at the current prices of B&W film.

    "Why slides?" Even the cheapo reversal film (e.g. Fujifilm Sensia 100) beats many negatives hands down in terms of colour saturation if properly exposed.

    Lightbox? I'll just use the cover light of my Epson Perfection 2400 Photo scanner to preview lor...loupe? I use the 50mm f/1.8 lens lor...

  16. #36
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    Default Printing from slides

    Do you guys normally print from slides directly or print from it's scanned image?

    How much would a roll of Velvia 100F cost? Best place to get ?

    Thanks.

  17. #37

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    since this topic is about slides, got a few questions to ask.

    1) provia 100F, issit alright for skin tones? i shot them before and they look great but i have never tried it on skin tones. heard it was not too bad?

    2) I dont have a DSLR, but those who have DSLR, are the highest quality of the digital pictures comparable or even better than the Slides? quality in terms of the details captured , colors and tones.

    3) anyone here shot astia before? how do you find the colors?

  18. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by eagles_creek
    Do you guys normally print from slides directly or print from it's scanned image?

    How much would a roll of Velvia 100F cost? Best place to get ?

    Thanks.
    I do think it's more economical to do a scan + print rather than a direct print. Anyway most digital labs do the former due to equipment makeup.

    A roll of Velvia would probably cost $9 upwards at Cathay Photo. BTW they offer one of the lowest prices for film around. If they're out of stock you can always try Ruby Photo that's just across the street from Cathay Photo.

  19. #39
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    CKiang, Yeah, hehehe cheapo method, in office and at home, my office monitor can go up to 140 luminance, good enough to view though. At home also very good, but like I said, it's an el-cheapo that works, but also afraid to dirty the screen. Hehe.

    bff: 1) Provia 100F i nvr used before, I've done VS on humans, colours are ok, mostly I do Astia on humans

    2) Comparable if you don't argue on details and gamut range, else slides will definitely win anytime, hands down.

    3) Yes I shoot astia for my models mainly, good skin colours and not so saturated colours on the overall.

  20. #40
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    Thanks Ah Pao.

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