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Thread: Help: transferring digital image to Physical prints

  1. #1
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    Default Help: transferring digital image to Physical prints

    Hi everyone, I hope I have posted my question in the correct section.

    I have edited my pictures using lightroom3 and would like to get the "sepia toned" images printed.

    I test print it at KT and the images appeared too brown so I test print with strips of graded saturation. I wanted to find the correct saturation this way. I used "split toning" Hue:41 and Saturation:20 for the original. For the test print I graded the saturation from 0 to 18 with +2 at each step. However, the test print lost the brown hue and showed very slight form of graduation in grey scale this time round. When they open my image again, the brown was lost for the test strips in their monitor even at Saturation:18. I know that my monitor is going to display differently from the print but would the difference mean the disappearance of the brown tone?

    Does anyone have experience in making sepia toned prints and can help me with this? Any workflow, print shop etc?

    Btw, the color prints are fine just need to tune brightness.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

  2. #2

    Default Re: Help: transferring digital image to Physical prints

    Did you calibrate your system? There are different calibration steps needed for screen and print.
    Alpha

  3. #3

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    Your workflow is not color managed at all. You need to calibrate your printers as well if you want to print your own photographs.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Help: transferring digital image to Physical prints

    Hi tonyep,
    Thanks for the reply. I did not calibrate the color management but my color prints at KT is fine. Moreover, they do not have the ICC profile for their current printer so they suggest that I test print instead. Would the lack of calibration lead to the lost of a brown hue? I mean at saturation 20 it was there but at 18 it is gone. It seems like a consistency issue. Have you printed sepia toned prints in one of the photo shops before? If you did, which one did you go? Thanks!

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Runz
    Hi tonyep,
    Thanks for the reply. I did not calibrate the color management but my color prints at KT is fine. Moreover, they do not have the ICC profile for their current printer so they suggest that I test print instead. Would the lack of calibration lead to the lost of a brown hue? I mean at saturation 20 it was there but at 18 it is gone. It seems like a consistency issue. Have you printed sepia toned prints in one of the photo shops before? If you did, which one did you go? Thanks!
    Each printer and paper has its own color gamut. Some has more, some has less. Which is why a calibration is needed to know the limit of both the printer and paper. Soft proofing is needed in order for the print to not be out of gamut. Once it's over the gamut, the print would look weird and have uneven gradients between colors and/or highlights to shadow.

    I do my own printings at home so I can't recommend any shops, sorry.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Help: transferring digital image to Physical prints

    what colour space did you use for your image/test prints?... how did you apply the "sepia" and how did you grade the saturations in your test prints?... just want to know the more about the image and the steps you took, not questioning whether your approach is right or wrong

  7. #7

    Default Re: Help: transferring digital image to Physical prints

    source: Photoshop Lightroom3 Streamlining your Digital photography process

    Chapter5 Quote: "Rendering intent
    Lightroom exports use the Perceptual rendering intent (and Black Point
    Compensation) to perform color space conversions; you can’t change this
    setting. Sometimes this produces color conversions with less than optimal
    results. If you’re exporting to jpg, you can use the Print module instead of export, which
    allows you to choose Relative rending intent. Many images will print best using
    Relative; see Chapter 6 for more information."

    "However, when you export a photo from Lightroom in any format other than Original, you must choose a color space for the new file, even if the original photo already has a profile embedded. (There are currently no options to automatically use the same profi le as the original, or to export a file without embedding a profile.)

    Example: if you work on a tiff file in Lightroom that has the ProPhoto profile embedded, you would still need to choose ProPhoto again when exporting if you want to keep the derivative fi le in that space.
    Th e Lightroom default (and most common) color spaces/profi les are:
    sr gb: “Standard rgb”; Developed by Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard around..."

    The info above might be helpful.What I can suggest is redo the test photo in lightroom and use Print module instead of export to save to JPG (making correct settings) and try again at the print shop.Ask operator to cancel/disable automatic colour management or other picture controls in the printer driver and select the correct type of paper.If inkjet ,need to let ink dry before checking colour output.

    The WYSIWYG myth should be debunked, even if monitor is calibrated it is impossible to match printer output
    simply because monitor is transmissive (transmit light to see colour) and print is reflective (reflects light).You can get close.

    Yes by all means calibrate as the eye is bad at judging absolute values like pure white values RGB 255,255,255
    or pure black RGB 0,0,0.
    Last edited by one eye jack; 10th April 2012 at 05:45 PM.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Help: transferring digital image to Physical prints

    Quote Originally Posted by one eye jack View Post
    The WYSIWYG myth should be debunked, even if monitor is calibrated it is impossible to match printer output
    simply because monitor is transmissive (transmit light to see colour) and print is reflective (reflects light).You can get close.

    Yes by all means calibrate as the eye is bad at judging absolute values like pure white values RGB 255,255,255
    or pure black RGB 0,0,0.
    monitor profiling is not only about visually matching printer output, which of course as you stated would not be a foolproof thing due to the nature of a screen vs a print... it is also about consistency of a screen's colour and luminance with other profiled monitors and for the same monitor over time...

    but crucially, regarding your statement of the "WYSIWYG myth", profiling allows for accurate soft proofing, where software like Photoshop or Lightroom (4 onwards, unfortunately I believe 3 and earlier do not have soft proofing) simulate how an image will look like when printed from a certain printer/ink/paper combination (which again is not gonna be 100% accurate) and (more importantly) shows you which parts are out of gamut of the printer/ink/paper combination so that trade-offs/adjustments may be made without first having to make a print...

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Help: transferring digital image to Physical prints

    Hi all, thanks for the valuable inputs!

    theRBK, I shot at AdobeRGB raw and I used light room to process and convert to jpeg sRGB. To have the sepia, I use split toning for shadows, set HUE at 41 and create multiple images with a +2 difference in saturation from 0 to 18. To combine the test strips, it was done in a crude way of joining them in keynote and exporting as a jpeg image. The resultant image maintained the graded tones when view in lightroom. However, the prints completely lost the "browns" even at 18 (the original print was set at 20). Thanks!

    one eye jack, thanks for the tips, I will try print module and see if it will solve my problem. I used "export" and my original file was AdobeRGB raw.

    Thanks all once again!

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Runz
    Hi all, thanks for the valuable inputs!

    theRBK, I shot at AdobeRGB raw and I used light room to process and convert to jpeg sRGB. To have the sepia, I use split toning for shadows, set HUE at 41 and create multiple images with a +2 difference in saturation from 0 to 18. To combine the test strips, it was done in a crude way of joining them in keynote and exporting as a jpeg image. The resultant image maintained the graded tones when view in lightroom. However, the prints completely lost the "browns" even at 18 (the original print was set at 20). Thanks!

    one eye jack, thanks for the tips, I will try print module and see if it will solve my problem. I used "export" and my original file was AdobeRGB raw.

    Thanks all once again!
    What you did wrong was using keynote. Does keynote maintain ICC profiles in the images? Use photoshop to do your test strips. There you can control your working color space so nothing like this happens.

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