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Thread: what is micro vs macro?

  1. #1
    Senior Member erictan8888's Avatar
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    Default what is micro vs macro?

    hi,

    been serving the net and noticed that the words micro appears in the name of nikor lenses....
    question:

    1. micro and macro? are they the same?

    2. i have a sigma 70-700mm Apo super II or something like that....
    it has macro capabilites from 200-300mm....

    what is the difference in the picture if i leave the switch at "normal" compared to when i select "macro" ?

    3. how does AF Micro-Nikkor 60mm f/2.8D compared to sigma 70-300mm compared to reversing 50mm f1.8 ?

    thanks
    Hope to learn from everyone here....

  2. #2

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    nikon calls it micro, canon calls it macro. both mean the same.

  3. #3

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    erhm....if i am not wrong nikon also got macro lens....micro lens tend to give u a "flattened" image whereas macro lens give u 1:1 reproduction of size....this is if i dun remember wrongly...remember seeing on the forum sometime back...

    for ya sigma apo macro.....leave it at normal and the focusing will not be as close if i am not wrong...if u already own it jzu experiment lo....

    cheers...

  4. #4
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    read the first para in the table under comments.

    http://www.naturfotograf.com/lens_spec.html

  5. #5

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    In the terms used here, they are exactly the same. Nikon in a marketing strategy many years ago decided to call their macro lenses "micro". Probably just to upset Canon Both the Nikkor micro lenses and the Canon macro lenses are corrected for flatness of field. Both brands are excellent.

    True macro starts at 1:1 (life size image on film area or ccd area), going up in ratio we have 2:1 (2x), 3:1, 4:1, 5:1 (5x), etc, etc.

    If we go down in ratio it works the other way. 1:2 (half life size) 1:3, 1:4, 1:5 (1/5 th life size), etc, etc.

    Macro photography or photomacrography is of course the photography of anything above and larger in ratio beyond 1:1.

    Closeup should describe anything below 1:1.

    Microscopy or photomicrography is when a camera is mounted on a microscope to take photographs.

    A reversed 50mm works just fine and takes a decent sized ratio. Problem is that unless you get some sort of unit for activating the levers or pins on the back of the lens, there is no way to control the apertures or auto functions. There are reversing gadgets that allow that but they are also expensive.

    The 60mm Nikkor micro/macro will do an excellent job for macro work. Brilliant optics, but you also need to get close to the subject.

    The sigma zoom will probably not have true macro capabilities. It will still work fine for closeup though from a good distance away. You can now add an extension tube to the sigma and it should focus closer again and might even get close to 1:1.

    Its just so much easier to call them all "Closeups", then we don't need to worry about all this at all.

    Phew, too many words from me . All the best and good luck.

    Danny.

  6. #6
    Senior Member erictan8888's Avatar
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    Default

    thanks a lot guys... very clear explanation....

    now my only problem is to decide what to get... hee hee

    sorry, another question:

    for instance, if i want to shoot and show the details of the eyes of a drangonfly, do i use a lens 1:2 or 2:1 ?
    what's the difference between 1:2 lens and 2:1 lens ?

    thanks in advance
    Last edited by erictan8888; 23rd December 2004 at 06:54 AM.
    Hope to learn from everyone here....

  7. #7

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    1:2 is half life size on the film or CCD size. 2:1 is twice life size on the same areas. So 2:1 will get you a decent full shot of a fly. Not just the head or eyes though. For that we need to aim at around a 5:1, 5x life size, depending on the size of film or CCD, but around there anyway.

    All the best and good luck...... by the way, what camera are we talking about , I'm not really sure

    Danny.
    Gotta love marcro ;)
    http://www.macrophotos.com

  8. #8
    Senior Member erictan8888's Avatar
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    two more questions:

    if i use the 50mm f1.8 reverse mounted on the D70, what is the focusing like?
    i understand must do manual focusing... is it manual focus on the lens ring or manual focus by shifting the tripod back and fro? in other words, with lens reversed, can i fixed the tipod at one place and using the ring on the lens to do manual focus?

    how about the aperture setting? since lens not connected to computer chip, how is the aperture setting on a reversed lens done?

    thanks in advance
    Hope to learn from everyone here....

  9. #9

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    Aperture can't be changed, it will stay wide open unless you get a reversing electronic connector. Seen them for Canon, but not for Nikon and they are expensive

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...&Q=&sku=197010

    So its not a good idea for the Nikon D70

    To focus yes, you just move the camera and lens forward or backward to focus. Your best option IMHO, is to get either a Nikon 6T or a Canon 250D and add that to the 50mm lens. They will give you good results for nature shooting. The are also corrected for chromatic aberrations while the single element cheaper version are not corrected for that. IMHO anyway.

    What other lenses do you have ???

    Danny.
    Gotta love marcro ;)
    http://www.macrophotos.com

  10. #10
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    If you want macro from 50mm lens and don't want to go thru all the trouble get a set of auto extension tube.

    Good work Danny in explaining all the above.
    Last edited by Dennis; 23rd December 2004 at 10:05 AM.

  11. #11
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    You can set the aperture when reversing a lens!

    1) Set the aperture on the lens
    2) Stop down the lens
    3) While stopping down the lens, take the lens out. The lens should still retain its 'stopped-down' position.
    4) Tada!
    The equipment can only bring you so far - the rest of the photographic journey is done by you.

  12. #12

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    Now thats clever Nick. Does that work for both Canon and Nikon as well ??? Very very clever.

    You know whats next don't ya "What can't I use auto metering"

    All the best Nick and that is clever

    Tubes is a good option Dennis, you are right.

    Danny.
    Last edited by nzmacro; 23rd December 2004 at 11:35 AM.
    Gotta love marcro ;)
    http://www.macrophotos.com

  13. #13
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    Is the Nikon 6T a close up filter?

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    Quote Originally Posted by erictan8888
    hi,

    been serving the net and noticed that the words micro appears in the name of nikor lenses....
    question:

    1. micro and macro? are they the same?

    2. i have a sigma 70-700mm Apo super II or something like that....
    it has macro capabilites from 200-300mm....

    what is the difference in the picture if i leave the switch at "normal" compared to when i select "macro" ?

    3. how does AF Micro-Nikkor 60mm f/2.8D compared to sigma 70-300mm compared to reversing 50mm f1.8 ?

    thanks
    70-700 ? lol i guess you are saying 70-300
    actually the macro mode can be use on the whole 70-300 range ...

  15. #15
    Senior Member erictan8888's Avatar
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    ya.... i mean 70-300mm sigma......
    the macro can only be used from 200-300mm.... but not macro enough for me leh...

    so was wondering if 50mm reversed lens can do macro....
    only problem is dun know how the focusing work.... sorry, but i did not get it from above posts. so using 50mm reverse lens need to focus by shifting camera back and fro or just fixed camera at one spot, then use the focusing ring no the lens?

    sorry... did not get the ans, so need to ask again....
    Hope to learn from everyone here....

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by erictan8888
    ya.... i mean 70-300mm sigma......
    the macro can only be used from 200-300mm.... but not macro enough for me leh...

    so was wondering if 50mm reversed lens can do macro....
    only problem is dun know how the focusing work.... sorry, but i did not get it from above posts. so using 50mm reverse lens need to focus by shifting camera back and fro or just fixed camera at one spot, then use the focusing ring no the lens?

    sorry... did not get the ans, so need to ask again....
    there is a way to use it for the whole 70-300 range
    turn to 200-300 turn on marco
    hold on to the marco switch and use a bit of force to turn it back
    thats why my friends did
    quite cool

  17. #17

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    Yes you just move the camera and lens to focus. The focus ring on the lens won't really do much at all. So move the camera and lens to focus

    Danny.
    Gotta love marcro ;)
    http://www.macrophotos.com

  18. #18
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    although you may have to check for vignetting when reversing a 50mm.

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by nickmak
    You can set the aperture when reversing a lens!

    1) Set the aperture on the lens
    2) Stop down the lens
    3) While stopping down the lens, take the lens out. The lens should still retain its 'stopped-down' position.
    4) Tada!
    this is only for canon EF lens

    for nikon and pentax and C/Y, just turn the aperture ring (nikon non-G lens only, all short primes have aperture ring)

    for newer minolta lens i think gotta use attachment to set the aperture

    canon FD lens got aperture ring also

  20. #20

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    nick's way i tink only works for nikon coz i dun tink canon got aperture ring on lens rite..

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