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Thread: Is it an offence to ride bicycles on footpaths/pavements?

  1. #21
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    like what goering said, humans were born with two legs, not two wheels.

  2. #22
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    frankly speaking i do cycle on da pavements .

    but we cyclist haf to b considerate enough s not to hurt or injure any other pedestrian who are usin da same pavement . . .

    to those who cycle recklessly , i suggest u guys stop it b4 da cops get u . . .

  3. #23

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    wah... i think they should also ban baby seat / wheel chair / trolley on mrt / buses / crowed area.... just hate those parents push that damn thing when there is alot of people squeezing back home... i encounter a couple in their 30s - 40s throwing their thing in the bus where passages were standing and there are alot of people in the bus, the things is like laying there like their father owes the bus company.... "they are like sitting very far away from the thing"

    sometimes the trolley is like empty coz the baby is in their arm or hand they can just keep it up so ppl can get in... "i'm not toking about single parent, i know is kinda hard" argg... just not very happy about it man....
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  4. #24

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    Hi,

    I never supported Cyclists on main road simply because it is too dangerous. Imagine this, a cyclist may hurt pedestrians by accident but a cyclist may most likely to die involving heavy vehicles accident on the main road. Moreover, I have never heard any pedestrian being hit and killed by cyclists. I suppose that's why the police keeps one eye shut. Some ppl may find it irritating for the cyclists to keep ringing the bells. Well, at least they ring to inform the pedestrians that they are coming ahead or behind you, it's better than totally "stealth". Got my point?

  5. #25

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    I am an avid cyclist, and this is how I see things.

    First, to correct a myth. A cyclist can kill a pedestrian. A cyclist does not need a very long footway to pick up enough speed to ram and kill a pedestrian. Some of you may have heard of the young teaching couple that was recently killed in an accident in New Zealand. But you may not know that about a year ago, their colleague was killed by a collision with a cyclist.

    Both footway and carriageway are part of a road. Footway are reserved for pedestrians to protect them from vehicles that might harm them. Prams and trolleys, etc., are unlikely to pose danger to pedestrians, and thus are allowed on the footway.

    Bicycles are vehicles, and can pose danger to pedestrians if the riders do not take proper care. They should be riden on the carriageway and not on footway. It will serve cyclists and other road users best if cyclists see themselves as drivers of vehicles, and not some grey pedestrian/driver hybrids.

    Relying on cyclists to "behave" themselves when riding on footway is not adequate to protect pedestrians. It only takes a small mistake or loss of concentration for a riding cyclist to hurt pedestrians.

    To share the footway with pedestrians, cyclists should dismount and push the bicycles--it is an easy and effective way to minimise the risk of an accident. Furthermore, pedestrians find dismounted cyclists less threatening, and are thus more wiling to share the footway with a dismounted cyclist.

    Bicycle bells, like car horns, should be used sparingly. Dismounted cyclists on a footway should remember that they are pedestrians pushing bicycles, just like pedestrians pushing trolleys. Cyclists who expect other pedestrians to give way because they ring a metal bell, are likely to be disappointed.

    I have been cycling on the carriageway for over twenty years. It is true that traffic has increased and the lanes have become narrower. But from what I see, most cyclists find the carriageway unsafe because they do not know the highway code or the traffic rules, do not wear proper safety gear, nor practise safe riding habits and skills. Some of the bicycles they ride are not even road worthy.

    Bicycle lanes tend to have high accident rate because they attract such unprepared riders. Look at the cyclists along the cyling lanes at East Coast Park, and you will see what I mean.
    Last edited by taku1a; 18th December 2004 at 01:46 AM.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by taku1a
    Relying on cyclists to "behave" themselves when riding on footway is not adequate to protect pedestrians. It only takes a small mistake or loss of concentration for a riding cyclist to hurt pedestrians.
    I have to disagree on this point. You're saying the the bicycles belong to the road. Thus, do I expect car drivers to "behave" themselves when I do ride on the road? When cycling on the road with vehicles travelling at 80 km/h, I'll end up in a hospital if I should even touch a car.

    Bicycles' speed is much more suited to the pedestrian walkways. Just becuase of a few idiots who cycle extremely fast (and worse, add motors to the bicycles) doesn't mean the rest are equally bad. I cycle on pedestrian walkways. When there's a clear way, I speed, when there's traffic, I slow down--common sense prevails.

    Unless Singapore builds a lane for cyclists on the road (like some European countries do), I'll stick to the pedestrian paths mostly.

    But I agree on one point, some cyclists at East Coast do live on the dangerous side... not all mind you.

  7. #27

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    I'm stayin in pasir ris and there are lots of cyclists riding along pavements, and I must say that I'm rather annoyed at most of them. The main reason is that they seem to expect the right of way and 'ring' their way through. I find it quite ridiculous.... imagine someone riding a motorbike on a pavement and honking at pedestrians to give way to him.

    I think many cyclists are not really that skilled in cycling and they therefore prefer to cycle on the pavements (to be quite evil, maybe they r thinkin tt they wld rather put others safety at risk by cyclin on pavements, than put their own life at risk by cycling on the road ). But anw, I think for less skilled cyclists, it wld be safer for everyone if they cycle on pavements, otherwise if they were to cycle on roads they may cause even greater danger... But just hope tt they would respect pedestrians and understand that pedestrians have the right of way and not expect pedestrians to give way to them.

    Another thing which i've noticed is that some cyclists put the red flashing light on the front of their bikes!! That's like a walking time bomb for a head-on collision!

    I guess there's a need for more education of road safety and ethics for the average cyclist in singapore.

  8. #28

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    I enjoy cycling, and I also have enough bad experiences with mindless cyclists, as a driver/motorist. My take on the issue in our local context is:

    1) If you are a confident cyclist, pls cycle on the side of the road. However, pls obey all traffic rules for motorist, esp stopping at zebra crossings and traffic light junctions. Mindless cyclist on the roads seem to think that they have special powers and need not stop at such crossings.

    2) If you are not so confident, or if you are carrying heavy loads (eg have child on bicycle child seat), do cycle slowly on the pavement. The key thing is that since you are on the pavement meant for pedestrians, do think and behave like a pedestrian i.e., obey traffic rules for pedestrian, looking left and right before using zebra crossings, wait for green man before crossing at traffic light junctions.

    My 2cts.

  9. #29

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by HOCL
    I enjoy cycling, and I also have enough bad experiences with mindless cyclists, as a driver/motorist. My take on the issue in our local context is:

    1) If you are a confident cyclist, pls cycle on the side of the road. However, pls obey all traffic rules for motorist, esp stopping at zebra crossings and traffic light junctions. Mindless cyclist on the roads seem to think that they have special powers and need not stop at such crossings.

    2) If you are not so confident, or if you are carrying heavy loads (eg have child on bicycle child seat), do cycle slowly on the pavement. The key thing is that since you are on the pavement meant for pedestrians, do think and behave like a pedestrian i.e., obey traffic rules for pedestrian, looking left and right before using zebra crossings, wait for green man before crossing at traffic light junctions.

    My 2cts.
    if i may add, push your bicycles across pedestrian crossings like pedestrians.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by zerofour
    wah... i think they should also ban baby seat / wheel chair / trolley on mrt / buses / crowed area.... just hate those parents push that damn thing when there is alot of people squeezing back home... i encounter a couple in their 30s - 40s throwing their thing in the bus where passages were standing and there are alot of people in the bus, the things is like laying there like their father owes the bus company.... "they are like sitting very far away from the thing"

    sometimes the trolley is like empty coz the baby is in their arm or hand they can just keep it up so ppl can get in... "i'm not toking about single parent, i know is kinda hard" argg... just not very happy about it man....

    When you become a parent with baby/kids, or even (touch wood) become temporary handicap and without your own transport, we'll see if you will say the same thing or not.

  11. #31
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    Default Pedestrian, motorist and cyclist

    I think the main issue here is not who should give way or who has the right of way. Laws and rules are just guidelines for us to follow. The most important thing is to live harmoniously with each other.

    While a pedestrian has the right of way on a pavement, it doesn't mean that he should be the king of the pavement and hog the way. If possible, just shift slightly to the side and let any cyclist past if you happen to see one. And a cyclist if for whatever reason ride on a pavement should keep extra caution and look out for other pedestrian, even if you have to stop.

    If there are bicycle lanes like the East Coast Park, a pedestrian should be considerate and try to avoid walking on the bicycle lane. And the cyclist should be mindful of their speed. There will always be somebody walking on the bicycle lane or other slower and not so skillful cyclist, especially kids and elderly.

    On the road, a cyclist should be knowledgeable of the basic road safety and wear proper protective gear. And they should install taillights/headlights and wear light coloured clothes to illuminate themselves. Obey all traffic rules. This will help protect the cyclist. A motorist should not think that they have the sole right to the road. A cyclist have an equal right to use the road. Be patient and give a cyclist more room. Overtake them as you would another car. Signal your intention to let other motoris/cyclist know your next move. often I've seen bus drivers overtake a cyclist just before a bus stop at the last minute and cut into the bus stop. The poor cyclist had to do an emergency stop to avoid being knock down.

    Be considerate and patient. Our world will be a better place to live in.

  12. #32

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    Actually this has been discussed before here.

    The discussion was triggered off by a picture I posted here in response to a recent flurry of criticisms in the ST forum page about cyclists on sidewalks. It was meant as a sardonic comment on the so called "evil cyclists" who live to run down pedestrians.

    This is the real reason I sometimes ride on the sidewalk. Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words.


  13. #33

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    This is certainly a hot topic... and a tricky one too...

    In Singapore, there's really no right place for a bicycle as a form of transport. If you ride on the pedestrian path, you risk running into someone. If you ride on the road, you risk being run over. Cyclist cannot be all grouped under one sterotype. I appreciate those groups of cyclist convoys that ride on the main road, simply because they watch out for traffic (not assuming anyone will give way to them) and they wear the proper attire (bright cycling attire, proper helmets and safety lights).

    Compare this with the neighbourhood ah-peks and young cyclists who either leisurely ride across the roads or just speeding everywhere. As a car owner, I'm pertrified of them. They simply don't care about your car, and you really have to watch out for them! In a t-junction when you're turning left, you'd better check your blind spot, because they'll be on your left blind spot, and they'll ride across the front of your turning car even though you've slowed down and signalled left way before. Or they'll hog the left lanes forcing motorists to swerve out to the other lane, which is dangerous for other road users. Grrr....

    Sorry for the ranting. I know not all cyclists are like that, but those of us who drive, you'll understand what I mean. Just providing a perspective from drivers, as opposed to the majority of previous postings from pedestrians. I'm not against cyclists, but I feel they should practice better road safety and courtesy.

  14. #34

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    I ride to school everyday from Bedok to Pasir Ris. Normally, I ride on the roads, except from the stretch of Bedok Reservoir Rd, where I ride on the pavement.

    This is because the drivers on that stretch of road, especially taxi drivers and buses go within centimetres of your bike. It's dangerous!

    But on less travelled lanes, I use the roads. And I appreciate the town councils who have placed a park link from Sun Plaza park in Tampines all the way to Pasir Ris park.

    Makes my ride easier.

    If bikes are to use the road, why aren't the motorists giving way?
    But this is slowly changing I think. Just yesterday at Loyang Point, I was doing a right turn. A taxi driver (Comfort Taxi) popped his head out and told me that he was U-turning. He told me to go ahead of him. This is the kind of drivers that Singapore needs. Courteous drivers.

    The driver's course should include some education on cyclists and tell drivers we cyclists have a right of way on the roads. Schools should also teach their students to give way to pedestrians if they use bikes to commute.

  15. #35

  16. #36

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    make it compulsory for cyclist to obtain a license by passing a theory test.

    Make all students read, study and PASS the highway code (modified for pedestrains) before they are allowed to go up to primary three.

    The number of fatal accidents involving students can be quite startling. And no use blaming the motorist/drivers if these children have no common sense to watch out for their own safety on the roads. Dont forget that death is relatively easy to deal with compared to the guilt one suffer eternally for running down a kid even though its of no fault of the driver..

  17. #37

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    i read somewhere that the human mind only matures in the 20's. so cant expect all students to have common sense. i see teens and young adults do silly things sometimes.

  18. #38
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    i can't imagine bicycles to be tagged with licence plates as they used to in the past...

  19. #39
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    so cyclists > motorist?

    Quote Originally Posted by xray
    Itell drivers we cyclists have a right of way on the roads.

  20. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by stingraytan
    make it compulsory for cyclist to obtain a license by passing a theory test.

    Make all students read, study and PASS the highway code (modified for pedestrains) before they are allowed to go up to primary three.

    The number of fatal accidents involving students can be quite startling. And no use blaming the motorist/drivers if these children have no common sense to watch out for their own safety on the roads. Dont forget that death is relatively easy to deal with compared to the guilt one suffer eternally for running down a kid even though its of no fault of the driver..
    2

    Theory and Practical Test, both compulsory, before they can ride out of their playground. And quote COE too, before the roads are flooded with bicycles.

    * togu runs away from all the cyclists.





    To be frank, I'm always irritated by those ring ring on the pathway, or those cycles that's like dashing towards you, then you'll have to siam here siam there. Grrrr.... and those kids shoes with wheels shoul... no... must be banned!!

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