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Thread: Setting up a new studio space - advice please?

  1. #1
    thecamerastudioshop
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    Default Setting up a new studio space - advice please?

    Hi guys,

    We have just started a little set-up of a studio space. Our current space is under renovation, but will be featuring 2 studios @ 800sqft and 1000sqft (with cyclorama) respectively.

    We started this studio with the intention of sharing the passion with like-minded people. Its kinda like a little playground to share our common interest with. We are trying to keep this place a little "boutique-like" without charging ridiculous prices. Now thing is, to do so, we would need to keep our cost down, and purchase only things that would be in used, or rather, valued by fellow users.

    Please share with us what would be a good studio to you guys, and what you would like to see in a "boutique" studio in which we envision this to be. Any comments will be welcomed, be it good or bad.


    Thanks in advance!!!

  2. #2
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    A bit strange if you're asking for suggestions at this point of time? Don't have a photography background I assume?

    Are you asking for equipment or amenities? Because equipment there can never be enough. Not just lighting but for cleaning, clothes steamer, wind machine, etc depending which genre of photographers you're looking to capture. Just look at some of your competitors websites for ideas of what essential items needed.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by foxtwo
    A bit strange if you're asking for suggestions at this point of time? Don't have a photography background I assume?

    Are you asking for equipment or amenities? Because equipment there can never be enough. Not just lighting but for cleaning, clothes steamer, wind machine, etc depending which genre of photographers you're looking to capture. Just look at some of your competitors websites for ideas of what essential items needed.
    I think he's talking about the style and design of the studio, he did mention "boutique-like".

    @ TS, I've never own a studio before but it would be nice if its clean and spacious. Not recommended to overload equipments around, doesn't look "boutique-like".

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Setting up a new studio space - advice please?

    You need a very big space for both equipment storage & maintaining a chic appearance. Or you can establish the ruling, BYOE (Bring Your Own Equipment). Then just add in down lights & mood lighting, snazzy couches for clients to lounge, open balcony for smoking area, a small bar for mixing drinks and preparing finger foods, mini meeting room, carpeted floor, classy men's and ladies toilets. Add a bed in the studio and you can start charging B&B. Look at the Club for inspiration. White walls, white cyclorama. *shrug*

    A studio is meant to be used. It matters less to impress clients when the studio does not work as well to benefit the photographer. Remind yourself what and who are you selling your product to.

  5. #5
    thecamerastudioshop
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    Default Re: Setting up a new studio space - advice please?

    Hey Foxtwo,

    Thanks for the comments!!! Not sure if our space is big or small. Its about 800sqft for the smaller one and about 1000sqft for the bigger one. Would BYOE be a good idea? I am under the impression that people would prefer to have readily available equipments for rental.
    Smoking area - We are considering that, since we already have a balcony. But not too sure if we are going ahead.
    Small bar - Good idea, but realistically would anyone be drinking there? Its gonna cost us quite abit to supply alcohol as well..
    Bed in studio.. ermmm

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Setting up a new studio space - advice please?

    Eh geez, can't tell when someone is poking for laughs?

    Sigh, didn't you have to prepare a business proposal before setting off on this adventure? Do you even know who your targeted audience is? I mean seriously, I don't really understand what a "boutique" studio is. I'm only comparing it to a hotel. Can you give a very clear explanation to sell your product? 50 word summary is enough.

    You're right, people do prefer to rent with equipment. Though there are also people out there with their own equipment but lack a studio space. So by BYOE you can only cater to a certain percentage of them. The market slice is small. On the other hand, if you provide equipment then how does it fit into this "boutique" look. Do you have space to store your equipment? Like SgDevilzz said, "large & spacious, without too much equipment". You as the studio provider, do you even know how much is too much? Different genre photographers require different sorts of equipment. If you know which photographers you're targeting then you will know roughly which equipment to get and which not to get.

    You've only mentioned how large each studio space is. Is that the only space there is once we enter the unit? Floor plan? Is there a waiting area for clients or talents or does it eat into the 1000/800sqft?

    I can think of a market where studio appearance will be of benefit. Fashion photography, especially when you have a gaggle of clients, MUA, stylist, talents, etc coming with the photographer. They will appreciate the design a lot more. But that's like a commercial job, aka not some TFCD. While every job and the amount of equipment required is different, how much equipment you provide will still determine whether your studio gets selected or that the photographer will rather go elsewhere. Photographers can choose to rent and transport equipment to your studio, provided the client will pay for this expense. Fashion talents also work a bit better loosen up, so you can provide ice, BYOA.

    So really, either way will work, just how much of a slice you want to eat. Consider the rates now, $35-45 per hour for those small studios. How do you plan to compete? Are you fighting with small studios or larger studios? Who is your targeted competition? How do you balance your rates with "boutique"? Going back to the hotels reference, are boutique hotels really cheaper than normal hotels? I'm only asking very few questions here... if you haven't thought this through... good luck to you ah...

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