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Thread: Night exposure

  1. #1

    Default Night exposure

    1. What area is the critique to be sought?
    Composition, exposure and post processing.

    2. What one's hope to achieve with the piece of work?
    I hope to give the viewer a sense of the majestic night scene that I saw at that point in time. Under the moonlight, the mountain was lit up in a way that was so enchanting to me.

    3. Under what circumstances is the picture taken? (physical conditions/emotions)
    this was taken at around 8pm at night (sunset in nepal was about 5pm) and it was very cold (i was shivering despite wearing all my down jacket and stuff) such that my camera kept showing low battery even with my spare batteries. not sure if my batteries could last a 30sec exposure so i didnt try (as i was also trying to take other shots as well besides this)

    4. What the critique seeker personally thinks of the picture?
    Personally I think there is a potential to shoot this in a better way but I was unable to figure out anything better so I'm hoping posting it on critique here will give me better insights approach this kind of night scene in future

    EXIF info: ISO800 5secs f/5.6 18mm (No filter was used)

    Another point is that when I printed this photo, the whites of the snow had a magenta cast to it. Not sure if because my monitor is not calibrated properly or because the printer is not reading the correct ICC profile. If you have a calibrated/accurate monitor please let me know if there is a magenta cast on the snow.

    Thanks in advance!


  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    Default Re: Night exposure

    Would be nicer if you have a separate exposure for the building lights. They're stealing attention here. And yes, there's a slight cast on the snow.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Night exposure

    Quote Originally Posted by foxtwo View Post
    Would be nicer if you have a separate exposure for the building lights. They're stealing attention here. And yes, there's a slight cast on the snow.
    hi foxtwo thanks for the critique! went to relook at my archives and i dont have any exposures without the blown highlights. now that you mention it, it really looks quite bad.

    i went to rework on this image using the same exposure and tried to bring out the whites of the mountains so as to balance against the building lights.

    is this be better?



    will keep in mind to make separate exposures in future.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    singapore
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    2,522

    Default Re: Night exposure

    Your post process technique needs some refinement. Are you using Photoshop?

    On the original image, add a new curves layer.
    Set the white dropper point (white snow)
    Set the black dropper point (trees)
    Set the grey dropper point (house)

    That should provide a more accurate colour rendition. But a bit too bright for my taste, so create a duplicate layer. Reduce brightness on the bottom layer and use a layer mask on the top layer to paint over the highlights (snow, buildings, foreground).

    For that single specular building light, make use of the vanishing point filter (if you have it) to clone the left-most building over it. If you don't have you can try using cut & paste & transform tool instead. It occupies a small part of the composition so it shouldn't really be very obvious. Anyway the snow mountains & stars will look so stunning no one's going to bother about a wall. Next time remember to watch out for your highlights.
    Last edited by foxtwo; 2nd March 2012 at 11:28 PM.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Night exposure

    hi foxtwo

    yes i'm using photoshop cs5. thanks so much for your guidance! i will go research on the vanishing point and try it out. will rework on this image again.

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