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Thread: Back grounds are too bright

  1. #21
    Member technoglitz87's Avatar
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    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    Quote Originally Posted by pbear1973 View Post
    Many DSLRs can help you with this. On the D7K you just need to press the BKT button, then use the front and rear dials to choose the # of shots (3 or 5) and the bracketing ev (-0.3, 0, +0.3), then mount on a tripod and take the 3 or 5 shots.

    HDR stacking in PS takes maybe 3-5 mouse clicks.
    I think only 3 shots available on the D7000, i really wish they had more options on bracketing..5 shots would realli be gd.. Nevertheless still wonderful. haha
    D7000/ MB-D11/ SB-700/ Tamron 17-50/ Sirui T1204x

  2. #22

    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    Quote Originally Posted by pbear1973 View Post
    I guess it won't need tripod if it snaps the 2 shots fast enough? Hard to believe that the shots would be perfectly aligned so any alignment and smoothing algorithm might introduce loss of IQ?
    Actually the alignment algorithm is pretty good. So far I've not noticed an IQ loss, though you may see something if you pixel-peep to 100%. DPR did tests and sample pics on the HDR mode.

    For the best IQ, 2 separate RAW files and manual blending will be best of course.
    Alpha

  3. #23

    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    Can try the graduated neutral density filter, use the nd on the bright background. I guess flash will do, but not in fill-in mode.

  4. #24
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    Quote Originally Posted by timwai View Post
    Can try the graduated neutral density filter, use the nd on the bright background. I guess flash will do, but not in fill-in mode.
    As mentioned already: You would need 2 filters to tone down the areas left and right of the obelisk. And flash during daytime on an object several meters high..?
    I would rather suggest using the right time of the day to get the best light, instead.
    EOS

  5. #25

    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    Quote Originally Posted by technoglitz87 View Post
    I think only 3 shots available on the D7000, i really wish they had more options on bracketing..5 shots would realli be gd.. Nevertheless still wonderful. haha
    You're right, I just tried. It only takes 3 shots.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rashkae View Post
    Actually the alignment algorithm is pretty good. So far I've not noticed an IQ loss, though you may see something if you pixel-peep to 100%. DPR did tests and sample pics on the HDR mode.

    For the best IQ, 2 separate RAW files and manual blending will be best of course.
    Yeah at the end as long as the eye sees great results, that's all that counts. It's silly to pixel-peep.
    Stuff I'm reasonably proud of: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ctky1973/

  6. #26
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    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    Quote Originally Posted by Rashkae View Post
    Nope.

    Nikon has active D-lighting, which is not the same as HDR.

    @TS: No, there is no attachment that will help. Even if you use a graduated ND filter, you'll only dim one side of the picture.
    Are you sure Nikon doesn't have HDR? My D5100 has built-in HDR option which can be found in the Shooting Menu. It can only be used in jpeg mode btw.

  7. #27

    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    Quote Originally Posted by mds80 View Post
    Are you sure Nikon doesn't have HDR? My D5100 has built-in HDR option which can be found in the Shooting Menu. It can only be used in jpeg mode btw.
    Oh you're right! I was basing it off the D7000 menu. I'd think the D5100 HDR would work like the Sony system - 2 different shots?
    Alpha

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    Quote Originally Posted by Rashkae View Post
    Oh you're right! I was basing it off the D7000 menu. I'd think the D5100 HDR would work like the Sony system - 2 different shots?
    Yes it takes 2 shots with the option to choose the exposure differential from 1-3 or auto

  9. #29

    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    Quote Originally Posted by Rashkae View Post
    That is correct. But note that the Sony HDR is "mild" and tries to look as natural as possible. A lot of people seem to prefer the over-cooked HDR look though.
    I'm so going to try.. and I prefer natural look so...
    Alpha
    Want to get back to photography

  10. #30
    Member Mythmaker's Avatar
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    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    Set flash at maximum power. Don't use any diffuser. Point straight ahead.

    Meter for the sky, +1 or +2 if necessary.

    Fire.

    If it doesn't work, your best bet is HDR, DRI or exposure blending/fusion like what most have suggested here. If you only have 3 shots handheld, -4, -2 and 0 is your best bet. Spot meter on the obelisk.

    If you don't want to HDR or such, then take the average exposure where you can still see the sky. Shoot in raw. Put in photoshop, bump up exposure for the obelisk. Then GND the sky in, probably need -4.
    Last edited by Mythmaker; 13th February 2012 at 08:37 PM.

  11. #31
    Moderator Octarine's Avatar
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    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    Quote Originally Posted by Mythmaker View Post
    Set flash at maximum power. Don't use any diffuser. Point straight ahead.
    Meter for the sky, +1 or +2 if necessary.
    Likely you mean EV -1 or -2 for the sky, right? Nevertheless, have a look at the size of the obelisk, consider the daylight, which hotshoe flash would be of any help here...? Even at FEV +2 quite impossible.
    EOS

  12. #32
    Member Fudgecakes's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Octarine
    Likely you mean EV -1 or -2 for the sky, right? Nevertheless, have a look at the size of the obelisk, consider the daylight, which hotshoe flash would be of any help here...? Even at FEV +2 quite impossible.
    Yep. It's either I blow out the sky or turn the obelisk black. The flash just made a weird patch of lighting on the obelisk
    There are no bad photographers, only photos that could've been done better
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  13. #33
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    You will need a D300(s) and above to do 5 to 9 shots bracketing. One of the few reasons why I gave D7k a miss and go straight for D300s.
    Equipment: D800|D700|11-16|28-75|105 Micro VR|50 F1.4G|85 F1.8G
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  14. #34
    Member technoglitz87's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cowseye
    You will need a D300(s) and above to do 5 to 9 shots bracketing. One of the few reasons why I gave D7k a miss and go straight for D300s.
    But considering and testing the iso performance along with the price point, i gave the d300s a miss as well haha
    D7000/ MB-D11/ SB-700/ Tamron 17-50/ Sirui T1204x

  15. #35
    Senior Member edutilos-'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    Quote Originally Posted by Fudgecakes View Post
    Hiya bros. I was just shooting some pictures near ACM when I realised that my subject (dalhousie obelisk) was very dark while the back ground was very bright.

    I tried using my flash and bringing down the iso and bringing up the shutter speed but the difference was minimal. Any ideas in how to solve this problem??
    You can take two exposures, one exposing for the subject, and one exposing for the background.

    Layer them in Photoshop, with the subject-exposed photograph below. You can then erase the top layer (exposed for the background) with a soft brush to reveal the subject. Do note that if the sun is in the picture your subject should not end up being the brightest thing in the picture. Cheers.

  16. #36

    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    Quote Originally Posted by Cowseye View Post
    You will need a D300(s) and above to do 5 to 9 shots bracketing. One of the few reasons why I gave D7k a miss and go straight for D300s.
    Or just use a tripod and do your own bracketing. No need to depend on the in-camera one.
    Alpha

  17. #37
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    I find is very interesting, when the days we have no digital, no photoshop, no HDR,
    how do people photograph all these? please don't tell me nobody can take such photos before the arrival of digital cameras.

    where is the art of searching best lighting for your subjects?
    if the lighting is not right, just come back another time or look for alternative angle.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
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  18. #38
    Senior Member edutilos-'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    I find is very interesting, when the days we have no digital, no photoshop, no HDR,
    how do people photograph all these? please don't tell me nobody can take such photos before the arrival of digital cameras.
    They bring spotlight?

  19. #39

    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    Quote Originally Posted by catchlights View Post
    I find is very interesting, when the days we have no digital, no photoshop, no HDR,
    how do people photograph all these? please don't tell me nobody can take such photos before the arrival of digital cameras.

    where is the art of searching best lighting for your subjects?
    if the lighting is not right, just come back another time or look for alternative angle.
    I think people become so dependent on the chip in the camera that they forget to use the gray matter between their ears. To me, people who understand the basics such as lighting, and seek it out, rather than those who limit themselves to a "right here, right now, how can I make my camera do magic" mentality, show the difference between a photographer and a GWC. The best photographers I've met (and admire) have an understanding of light that is spectacular, and always delivers awesome images regardless of the media used.
    Alpha

  20. #40
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
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    Default Re: Back grounds are too bright

    Quote Originally Posted by edutilos- View Post
    They bring spotlight?
    lol,

    ok, lets take the CDB scene for an example, if taken from esplanade or MBS side, other than night shots, the best time to take is in the morning, where as all skyscraper are in frontal lighting.
    if shots are taken in the afternoon, all the building facing you will be in shadows, the colors will not be that vibrant, and it look hazy too, so would you prefer to photoshop/HDR it or come back in the morning?
    Last edited by catchlights; 14th February 2012 at 11:15 AM.
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