Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: more fireworks

  1. #1

    Default more fireworks

    taken from outside the indoor stadium






  2. #2

  3. #3

    Default

    I like the second one

    what settings/ film did you use?

    did you use tripod, black card, etc?

  4. #4

    Default

    Software - Digital Camera FinePix S602 ZOOM Ver1.00

    ExposureTime - 10/40 seconds
    FNumber - 2.8000
    ExposureProgram - 8 (landscape mode)
    ISOSpeedRatings - 200

    ShutterSpeedValue - 1/4 seconds
    ApertureValue - F 2.83
    MeteringMode - 5 (multi-segment)
    LightSource - 0 (auto)


    I used the landscape mode to help me focus. tripod was used. basically just plant and shoot. No black card was used.

    How could i improve on these shots ? Composition wise as well as technical wise ?

  5. #5

    Default

    unfortunately, don't know much myself

    don't even know how/why to use the black card ...


  6. #6

    Default

    according to Jed's article, the black card is used to cover your lens to prevent overexposure from the stadium lights when you pause for long periods waiting for more fireworks.

    But the NE show shot was so fast i didn't even think of stopping...

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,911

    Default

    Yup the black card isn't really necessary for Singapore fireworks, it's really a legacy from advice given by photographers from the West who don't have the fortune of such large and expensive fireworks displays. Those over here tend to be *very* small scale affairs, so frequency, size and duration tends to be far less intense.

    You work has several areas of improvement.

    [1] Some shots are far too overexposed.
    [2] You've got too many bursts in some of your shots too. Try using a shorter shutter speed.
    [3] The wide-angle shots are too wide-angle. Or if you want to shoot them as you did, you need a stronger anchor point; the stadium is too indistinct and too unimpressive from that distance and angle to anchor the shots well.

  8. #8

    Default

    Originally posted by Jed
    You work has several areas of improvement.

    [1] Some shots are far too overexposed.
    [2] You've got too many bursts in some of your shots too. Try using a shorter shutter speed.
    [3] The wide-angle shots are too wide-angle. Or if you want to shoot them as you did, you need a stronger anchor point; the stadium is too indistinct and too unimpressive from that distance and angle to anchor the shots well.
    Point taken. However, I was already underexposing many parts of other scenery. The fireworks was brighter than I thought. Should I underexpose the shot more ? I'll try with a shorter shutter speed, and probably fill in the frame more.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,911

    Default

    Well you apparently read my article and (correctly) disregarded the black card. Maybe you shouldn't have disregarded the aperture settings?

  10. #10

    Default

    roger that. Will autofocus be a problem in manual mode ?

    According to your article recommendations,
    >f8-11 at around 1/60s, ISO 100 (160 lowest for my cam).

    will try that out.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    3,911

    Default

    Well then adjust those aperture settings. Aperture settings are only accurate in relation to a given film sensitivity, I provided an EI of 100 as a base point. Doesn't mean you cannot shoot at any EI out there and adjust your aperture accordingly.

    Yes, autofocus will be a problem because it may very well hunt around the place.

  12. #12

    Default

    Originally posted by Jed
    Yup the black card isn't really necessary for Singapore fireworks
    IMO, the black card is necessary to take good fireworks pictures here.

    Our fireworks tend to go off too quickly, and in too high an intensity to make good pictures. From the non photographer, it looks really good, but on film, we get too much smoke, and scatter that causes distractions.

    Thus the black card is needed to cover the lens once the initial burst of the firework is over. Usually, just 2-3 bursts are enough to cover the sky, number varies according to the type of firework being released.

    In preparing for a fireworks shoot, first take an exposure reading of your foreground. Leave your aperture around f8 or f11 if possible. I will aim to adjust ISO, followed by aperture to achieve a 2-3 second exposure for the foreground. This minimises the time I need to exposure for foreground thus I can take more shots / pay more attention to the fireworks.

    Set to bulb if possible. Otherwise, use about 6-8 seconds exposure. First 2-3 seconds, exposure full frame. Then cover the foreground with black card thereafter.

    Cover the entire lens if:

    1. The firework explosion is really huge, too bright.
    2. You don't really like that particular pattern.
    3. There is no firework (short pause / break)

    Another method would of course be to combine pictures...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •