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Thread: Does the 18% Gray issue still apply to digital camera?

  1. #1

    Default Does the 18% Gray issue still apply to digital camera?

    Hi, was wondering if there is any experts down there want to share their experience?
    Last edited by jimtong; 17th July 2002 at 11:48 PM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Does the 18% Gray issue in 35mm film affect digital camera?

    Originally posted by jimtong
    Hi was wondering if there is any experts down there know about this issue?
    If you are talking about the light meter being calibrated to 18% gray, yes, it's applicable to digicams as well. Point your camera at snow for example, take a shot without compensation, and the snow will appear gray.

    Regards
    CK

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    Default Re: Does the 18% Gray issue still apply to digital camera?

    Originally posted by jimtong
    Hi, was wondering if there is any experts down there want to share their experience?
    The theory still stands in the digital world.
    But please note that a good exposure will not be strickly dependent on 18% grey. The most important cosideration in setting exposure is to record as much latitudes and the most important part of latitudes. When you are shooting very dark object it is recommended to increase exposure by 1-stop from the 18% reading(this is written in the manual of Kodak greycard). This is not about artistic/creative exposure, this is still about correct everyday practice.

    when extended to the digital world, most consumer digitals blow out highlights rather easily. So you may need to underexpose a little to prevent that in some cases. Pulling out shadow details in PS introduce noise, but there is simply no way to get back lost highlight.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Re: Does the 18% Gray issue still apply to digital camera?

    Originally posted by zhoufang


    The theory still stands in the digital world.
    But please note that a good exposure will not be strickly dependent on 18% grey. The most important cosideration in setting exposure is to record as much latitudes and the most important part of latitudes. When you are shooting very dark object it is recommended to increase exposure by 1-stop from the 18% reading(this is written in the manual of Kodak greycard). This is not about artistic/creative exposure, this is still about correct everyday practice.

    when extended to the digital world, most consumer digitals blow out highlights rather easily. So you may need to underexpose a little to prevent that in some cases. Pulling out shadow details in PS introduce noise, but there is simply no way to get back lost highlight.
    Thanks for sharing your knowledge. But your point on the increasing of explosure by a stop when shooting black subject will make other white or gray subjects in the photo to be over expose. Normally I will jus reduce by 1-stop to 1.5-stop when i reference a dark subject. comment?

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    Default Re: Re: Re: Does the 18% Gray issue still apply to digital camera?

    Originally posted by jimtong


    Thanks for sharing your knowledge. But your point on the increasing of explosure by a stop when shooting black subject will make other white or gray subjects in the photo to be over expose. Normally I will jus reduce by 1-stop to 1.5-stop when i reference a dark subject. comment?
    I'm talking about +1 stop from incident meter reading or a spot meter reading when pointed to a greycard. These readings are only a measurement of the ambient light level and will not at all be affected by the reflectivity of your subject. (black cat or white cat makes no difference)

    The -1 to -1.5 stop that you are talking about is based on the autoexposure reading given by your camera, typically a multi-zone matrix metering. This kind of metering will be fooled by the subject's reflectivity, ie it give different reading when pointed to a black cat vs a white cat, even when the ambient light level is the same. That's why you need a grey card

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