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Thread: A Question About Gamma (& Aperture 3)

  1. #1

    Default A Question About Gamma (& Aperture 3)

    any constructive explainations and help would be appretiated. Googled I have. many times. And I am still confused right now.

    This is with regards to Apple Aperture 3. In the JPEG export presets window, there's something called Gamma Adjust. It allows the adjusting from 1.0 to 1.5.
    Having read the Apple Aperture 3 help, I still do not understand why this Gamma thing is needed.

    Also, why is it that it is not within the numbers of screen gamma? for example, from what I have searched up on screen gamma and calibration stuff, it can range from values such as 1.8 to 2.4 and so on. and Aperture cant go above 1.5.

    1) Has that gamma in aperture 3 have anything to do with screen gamma?
    2) what am I supposed to set it to then? leave it at 1.0 in aperture 3 jpeg exports?

  2. #2

    Default Re: A Question About Gamma (& Aperture 3)

    bump for some help...

  3. #3

    Default Re: A Question About Gamma (& Aperture 3)

    I have a feeling not many of us know.
    im a LR user so im not sure either.

    What i can say is, try it out yourself. Experiment. It's free what. Just spend 1-2 hours on it.
    You'll become an expert on it in no time.

  4. #4

    Default Re: A Question About Gamma (& Aperture 3)

    The gamma curve is the translation of input values ( e.g. picture data) to output values ( e.g. screen or print data). In an ideal world, this would be one to one, but as we are not in an ideal world it is a non linear translation , matching input and output data to create the desired result.
    Basically , it can be compared with a color profile ( also a color profile is more complex), maybe this helps for better understanding. If the image that you see has X amount of colors, your camera can capture Y amount of colors, and your printer can print z amount of colors, you must match them to create a pictures, that looks in total like the original as much as possible, even so, you can not use the same colors to create it.

  5. #5

    Default Re: A Question About Gamma (& Aperture 3)

    Quote Originally Posted by Achim Reh View Post
    The gamma curve is the translation of input values ( e.g. picture data) to output values ( e.g. screen or print data). In an ideal world, this would be one to one, but as we are not in an ideal world it is a non linear translation , matching input and output data to create the desired result.
    Basically , it can be compared with a color profile ( also a color profile is more complex), maybe this helps for better understanding. If the image that you see has X amount of colors, your camera can capture Y amount of colors, and your printer can print z amount of colors, you must match them to create a pictures, that looks in total like the original as much as possible, even so, you can not use the same colors to create it.
    Thanks for your input...

    I still can't really get the exact look I see in Aperture after exporting, which is understandable since im moving to sRGB color space, but the gamma thing does make quite abit of impact on the exported image, and I hope someone can answer the questions I have above.

  6. #6

    Default Re: A Question About Gamma (& Aperture 3)

    A typical example. Here the picture with a straight game curve without adjustment. The " Maybank " company logo on the to right and the UOB Logo Top right border , can not be read at all, far too bright.

    [IMG] nonadjuted by AchimReh, on Flickr[/IMG]

    With the gamma curve adjusted , this bright lights are not so strong anymore . Maybank and UOB can be seen clearly .

    [IMG] uobnightfull by AchimReh, on Flickr[/IMG]

    Enlargement of the UOB Logo

    [IMG] uobnighpart by AchimReh, on Flickr[/IMG]

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