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Thread: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

  1. #21
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    Default Re: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

    Get a dry cabinet esp for SGP humidity, you really don't want to take chances on your equipment. You could get a small one (like a 30L) if you can't afford bigger ones. It's not very high power consumption, only 4 Watts.

  2. #22

    Default Re: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

    All I can say is good luck to your gears!
    7D w/ 70-300mm/50mm1.8/70-200F4L/17-50mm F2.8

  3. #23
    Member pasay's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

    maybe in a pinch, you can try that as a temporary solution. but in terms of economy, practicality and for the sake of your sanity , get a dry cabinet
    a Nikon body, some lenses, a flash, and a whole lot of dusty photos

  4. #24

    Default Re: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

    Quote Originally Posted by limwsv View Post
    (1) Humidity is water in the air.
    (2) No air = No water

    - Put camera and lens in locknlock vacuum bag.
    - Suck out as much of the air as possible.
    - Voila, don't think fungus can grow in partial vacuum and low humidity.
    Good if a vacuum can be created. If partial, the humidity is the same.

  5. #25
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    Default Re: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

    Quote Originally Posted by soeypixels View Post
    save $2 a day, in 3 months u can get a dry cabinet
    or get a drybox in 15 days... but i still prefer dry cabinet...
    Canon 550D /18-135/50 1.8/75-300 USM III/10-22/70-200 f2.8L IS II/

  6. #26
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    Default Re: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

    the cheapest way is to use your lenses and camera. those fungus grow well in stagnant air.
    cameras are not made of tofu

  7. #27

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    Er. I use drybox with Cheap Hungry Hippo. The humidity meter sez Low. Shld be ok rite?

  8. #28

    Default Re: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

    Yup.. dry box with thirsty hippo should be ok..

    As for using the vacuum, if you use a partial vacuum, it means there is still air in the bag. Relative humidity refers to a percentage of water vapour in the air. My feel is that whether out in the air or a semi-vacuum, the R.H stays the same.
    Alpha
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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by kor69
    Er. I use drybox with Cheap Hungry Hippo. The humidity meter sez Low. Shld be ok rite?
    If RH is too low, the lubricants will dry up and it might also damage the rubber parts of your gear..
    Look in your camera manual for the recommended storage conditions..
    Most people keep a RH of 45-55%..
    Like most have mentioned here, get a dry cabinet, save all the woes
    Canon 550D | EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6IS | EF 50mm f/1.8II |
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  10. #30

    Default Re: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

    The optimal levels for cameras and lenses is actually 35% to 45%.

    55% is a bit too high but acceptable.

    Below 30% is no good either coz another type of fungus grows in that zone and rubber parts harden and cracks faster.

    I keep the two dry cabinets holding DSLR gear at about 40%. Another dry cabinet I have holding the older medium format and film gears, I keep it around 45%.

    Modern gear tends to have less lubricants, or higher tech non organic lubricants that are less susceptible to drying up
    WTB Manfrotto RC4 L Bracket

  11. #31

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    Come on, one dry cab costs less than a handphone.

    How many times a person change the HP?

    The dry cab lasts much much longer than any Hp......

    Do the sums......

  12. #32

    Default Re: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

    I definitely wont waste my time and effort doing these kind of things..to save that little money..heard of opportunity cost?
    Come on a dry cabinet is only what..$100-120?

    If money is an issue..then just try to minimize your spending on entertainment/food.
    Having said that..if you think its still ok.. Well, nothing wrong too. But you have been warn..if your gear got fungus..the repair will be costly. (maybe more than a dry cabinet.)
    Last edited by TWmilkteaTW; 3rd January 2012 at 02:57 PM.

  13. #33
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    Default Re: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

    I once paid $130++ to clean a fungus "infection", not worth it. Get a Dry cabi and save all the trouble and hassle.

  14. #34

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    Guys,

    give the guy a break. He/she suggested what he/she thought is something that can work. No need to kill him/her, just advise why it's a bad idea.

  15. #35

    Default Re: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

    Quote Originally Posted by TheDreamShot View Post
    I once paid $130++ to clean a fungus "infection", not worth it. Get a Dry cabi and save all the trouble and hassle.
    i recently also send my lens to cleaning...got a small dot of fungus....using the air tight container silica gel combo...learned my lesson. dry cabinet is the way to go. just bought the lens few months ago and kena liaw.

  16. #36

    Default Re: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

    I had 2 cases of lens fungus INSIDE A WELL WORKING DRY CABINET, in the last 3 years. Yes, thats the case. I spoke to several experts about this, and it is true, dry cabinets are not a 100% protection. I now changed to the process of dry air+ light. I equipped my dry cabinets with LED lighting on all levels , and remove the front and rear cap of my lenses.

  17. #37
    Senior Member Cheesecake's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

    Quote Originally Posted by Achim Reh View Post
    I had 2 cases of lens fungus INSIDE A WELL WORKING DRY CABINET, in the last 3 years. Yes, thats the case. I spoke to several experts about this, and it is true, dry cabinets are not a 100% protection. I now changed to the process of dry air+ light. I equipped my dry cabinets with LED lighting on all levels , and remove the front and rear cap of my lenses.
    i've been using my dry cabinet for the past 10yrs+. the humidity level is always at around 50.

    nvr had such an issue as described by you.


    maybe ur dry cabinet is not working well? or maybe the reading meter is faulty?
    You'll Never Walk Alone! - i have the best job in the world!

  18. #38

    Default Re: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

    I also have dry cabinets since I moved to Singapore 13 years ago. After the first incident ( about 3 years ago), I checked the humidity level, it was ok at around 40% . Built in meter working correctly. I cleaned the dry cabinet inside with alcohol, and also cleaned lenses and other equipment as good as possible. Now, 3 years later, I had the second case. I talked to an lens expert form one OEM manufacturer, who told me that this is not uncommon, specially if the lens is closed ( front and rear cap) and it is not used for a long time ( the lens with the fungus was standing in there for around 3 to 4 years without usage) . So, the combination of dry air and light gives some extra protection. At least, that was the advise I got . I will find out one day.
    Other countries do not have this problem. I am in germany at the moment and found 2 old cameras in the basement of my house ...I mean , old, between 60 and 80 years . The where just packed in a shoe box, and must have been there for at least 40 years untouched.....not a slightest sign of fungus . Singapore weather is really bad for camera equipment.

  19. #39
    Senior Member Cheesecake's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

    Quote Originally Posted by Achim Reh View Post
    I also have dry cabinets since I moved to Singapore 13 years ago. After the first incident ( about 3 years ago), I checked the humidity level, it was ok at around 40% . Built in meter working correctly. I cleaned the dry cabinet inside with alcohol, and also cleaned lenses and other equipment as good as possible. Now, 3 years later, I had the second case. I talked to an lens expert form one OEM manufacturer, who told me that this is not uncommon, specially if the lens is closed ( front and rear cap) and it is not used for a long time ( the lens with the fungus was standing in there for around 3 to 4 years without usage) . So, the combination of dry air and light gives some extra protection. At least, that was the advise I got . I will find out one day.
    Other countries do not have this problem. I am in germany at the moment and found 2 old cameras in the basement of my house ...I mean , old, between 60 and 80 years . The where just packed in a shoe box, and must have been there for at least 40 years untouched.....not a slightest sign of fungus . Singapore weather is really bad for camera equipment.


    keep us updated, thanks!
    You'll Never Walk Alone! - i have the best job in the world!

  20. #40
    Senior Member sinned79's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Cheapo Way for Beating Fungus to your Lens

    Quote Originally Posted by Achim Reh View Post
    I had 2 cases of lens fungus INSIDE A WELL WORKING DRY CABINET, in the last 3 years. Yes, thats the case. I spoke to several experts about this, and it is true, dry cabinets are not a 100% protection. I now changed to the process of dry air+ light. I equipped my dry cabinets with LED lighting on all levels , and remove the front and rear cap of my lenses.
    Quote Originally Posted by Achim Reh View Post
    I also have dry cabinets since I moved to Singapore 13 years ago. After the first incident ( about 3 years ago), I checked the humidity level, it was ok at around 40% . Built in meter working correctly. I cleaned the dry cabinet inside with alcohol, and also cleaned lenses and other equipment as good as possible. Now, 3 years later, I had the second case. I talked to an lens expert form one OEM manufacturer, who told me that this is not uncommon, specially if the lens is closed ( front and rear cap) and it is not used for a long time ( the lens with the fungus was standing in there for around 3 to 4 years without usage) . So, the combination of dry air and light gives some extra protection. At least, that was the advise I got . I will find out one day.
    Other countries do not have this problem. I am in germany at the moment and found 2 old cameras in the basement of my house ...I mean , old, between 60 and 80 years . The where just packed in a shoe box, and must have been there for at least 40 years untouched.....not a slightest sign of fungus . Singapore weather is really bad for camera equipment.
    thanks for the great information.

    i mostly shoot during weekends only. guess i should periodically bring out my equipments to check as well.

    possible to show a photo how u added LED to your dry cabinet? your LED running on batteries?

    i have a tendency to remove my front/rear caps as well when my lenses comes in contact with rain or water then store for 1 day before putting it back on (cos afraid that the lubricants may dry up faster if i leave the lenses uncapped).
    Last edited by sinned79; 4th January 2012 at 03:15 PM.

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