Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: Architectural and Interior

  1. #1

    Default Architectural and Interior

    Hi All,

    Would like to have some advice form more experienced photographers around.
    I am new into photography and doing as a hobby. I am kinda interested in trying out architectural shots of buildings (houses, church etc). I also feel like doing residential interior shots (like those we can see in interior design magazines).
    I am currently using a nikon d90 couple with kit 18-55 and 24-75 f2.8 and looking to upgrade.

    1) As a DX body, doing architectural, what kind of budget WA lens can i get? Do u think i can start from a 17-50mm?
    2) Any tips for taking architectural or interior shots?

    I am doing as a hobby so i don't want to spend 3/4 of my months pay on a lens. I wana start simple and upgrade. I also like to be versatile to have a zoom rather than a prime. Unless, of cos if the prime is better than the zoom in many ways..?
    Thanks for your advise.

  2. #2
    Senior Member bonrya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    In a mobile cage
    Posts
    2,633

    Default

    The 17-50 is not much different from your kit lens.

    There are uwa lenses.. And even tilt shift lenses available if you specifically want to do architectural photography....

    That being said, this is the wrong section and subforum to post this thread.. You'll be moved to the correct section soon..
    My Flickr
    ~Neko baka

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    6,436

    Default Re: Architectural and Interior

    Any wide lens is ok. Just stitch two images in Photoshop if you require. Don't distort too much. Always make sure that the vertical lines are straight and not slanted. Keep your camera at chest level, about 150 cm from the ground.
    Don't brag about your accomplishments; Show us your future works.

  4. #4
    Member Kongfu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    S'pore, Sengkang
    Posts
    513

    Default Re: Architectural and Interior

    Quote Originally Posted by JacePhoto View Post
    Any wide lens is ok. Just stitch two images in Photoshop if you require. Don't distort too much. Always make sure that the vertical lines are straight and not slanted. Keep your camera at chest level, about 150 cm from the ground.
    Hi Bro,

    How do we keep the vertical lines straight when using the wide end?? All the bldgs in the corner of my photos are always slanting. how do I correct this w/o using PP? Looking forward to learning from you.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    720

    Default Re: Architectural and Interior

    You can seach bns for 2nd hand tokina 11-16mm cos I used to shoot interior using the tokina pair with D90.

  6. #6
    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    rainy Singapore
    Posts
    9,523

    Default Re: Architectural and Interior

    Quote Originally Posted by Levis View Post
    You can seach bns for 2nd hand tokina 11-16mm cos I used to shoot interior using the tokina pair with D90.
    2nd that... 11-16 should be nice and wide with D90.
    Not terribly expensive too. (I don't know how much exactly is "3/4 month's pay" though )

    If camera is horizontal, that should mitigate the slanting verticals due to perspective distortion.
    Exploring! :)

  7. #7
    Senior Member oracle0711's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Settling down in Punggol
    Posts
    2,133

    Default Re: Architectural and Interior

    If you are not planning to get a tilt-shift lens (which is good to have but not necessarily a must have) is to use a wide angle lens (such as 17mm), do a pano and stitched the pictures together. You can then perform distortion correction using software such as adobe photoshop and finish it off with some cropping to get to the composition you need. When doing architecture photography, you should not rush to get the picture. In fact, you need to plan and frame your shot with patience and pay more attention to lighting and composition. You will enjoy it more and more as you grow to appreciate the beauty of architecture designs.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Architectural and Interior

    Quote Originally Posted by ravon11 View Post
    Hi All,

    Would like to have some advice form more experienced photographers around.
    I am new into photography and doing as a hobby. I am kinda interested in trying out architectural shots of buildings (houses, church etc). I also feel like doing residential interior shots (like those we can see in interior design magazines).
    I am currently using a nikon d90 couple with kit 18-55 and 24-75 f2.8 and looking to upgrade.

    1) As a DX body, doing architectural, what kind of budget WA lens can i get? Do u think i can start from a 17-50mm?
    2) Any tips for taking architectural or interior shots?

    I am doing as a hobby so i don't want to spend 3/4 of my months pay on a lens. I wana start simple and upgrade. I also like to be versatile to have a zoom rather than a prime. Unless, of cos if the prime is better than the zoom in many ways..?
    Thanks for your advise.
    you can continue using your 18-55 to shoot.
    Any larger fov required, you can try to look for a sigma 10-20 f4-5.6 lens. value for money lens.
    there is no real gain in having a f2.8 because you will be shooting with an aperture somewhere between f8-f16 to get a big dof.
    The most important thing to acquire are Flash(es) and the accessories for off camera flash and diffusers.
    and sturdy tripod
    Last edited by coolthought; 21st December 2011 at 01:56 PM.
    Coolthought - 冷静思考 - クールだ http://xaa.xanga.com/0aba0666d143253.../t35917343.gif

  9. #9

    Default Re: Architectural and Interior

    Thanks bonrya..
    I know the 17-50mm is not much diff in focal length. But i thought at f2.8 it have much control over F stops, clarity, low light etc?
    Or what uwa do u recommend to start with? like a 12-24mm?
    I am not really into only architectural. I want a lens that can cover that and other shots.

  10. #10
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,902

    Default Re: Architectural and Interior

    Quote Originally Posted by ravon11 View Post
    Thanks bonrya..
    I know the 17-50mm is not much diff in focal length. But i thought at f2.8 it have much control over F stops, clarity, low light etc?
    Or what uwa do u recommend to start with? like a 12-24mm?
    I am not really into only architectural. I want a lens that can cover that and other shots.
    you will be shooting at f11 or even f16, good tripod is a must.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  11. #11

    Default Re: Architectural and Interior

    Quote Originally Posted by JacePhoto View Post
    Any wide lens is ok. Just stitch two images in Photoshop if you require. Don't distort too much. Always make sure that the vertical lines are straight and not slanted. Keep your camera at chest level, about 150 cm from the ground.
    Thanks for the advice... any reason why 150cm from ground?

  12. #12

    Default Re: Architectural and Interior

    Quote Originally Posted by coolthought View Post
    you can continue using your 18-55 to shoot.
    Any larger fov required, you can try to look for a sigma 10-20 f4-5.6 lens. value for money lens.
    there is no real gain in having a f2.8 because you will be shooting with an aperture somewhere between f8-f16 to get a big dof.
    The most important thing to acquire are Flash(es) and the accessories for off camera flash and diffusers.
    and sturdy tripod
    Thanks .. At 10mm,DX body, will there be too much distortion? Also, lets just say a general shot of few buildings, what kind of F stops are we looking at? I have a fellow photographer telling me not much diff in F11-F22 and beyond.. Not sure if he is correct?
    I personally tried F8-F11,16 etc.. like not much diff. (Bright daylight)..
    Care to elaborate why you mention flashes and off cam flash for architectural/ buildings..? Like flash painting?

  13. #13

    Default Re: Architectural and Interior

    Quote Originally Posted by Levis View Post
    You can seach bns for 2nd hand tokina 11-16mm cos I used to shoot interior using the tokina pair with D90.
    Interior do you mean residential? Will it have too much distortion at the ends?

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    720

    Default Re: Architectural and Interior

    Not much, can show you my link if needed.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Architectural and Interior

    Quote Originally Posted by Levis View Post
    Not much, can show you my link if needed.
    Thanks. Can you PM ur link?

  16. #16
    Senior Member ZerocoolAstra's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    rainy Singapore
    Posts
    9,523

    Default Re: Architectural and Interior

    Quote Originally Posted by ravon11 View Post
    Thanks bonrya..
    I know the 17-50mm is not much diff in focal length. But i thought at f2.8 it have much control over F stops, clarity, low light etc?
    Or what uwa do u recommend to start with? like a 12-24mm?
    I am not really into only architectural. I want a lens that can cover that and other shots.
    If you want a UWA that also has f/2.8 for low light, then the Tokina 11-16 f/2.8 really fits the bill.
    Are you intending to take such interior photos professionally?
    Exploring! :)

  17. #17
    Moderator catchlights's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Punggol, Singapore
    Posts
    21,902

    Default Re: Architectural and Interior

    Quote Originally Posted by ravon11 View Post
    Thanks for the advice... any reason why 150cm from ground?
    average ceiling height is 3m, so please do your math.
    Shoot to Live, Live to Shoot
    www.benjaminloo.com | iStock portfolio

  18. #18
    Senior Member bonrya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    In a mobile cage
    Posts
    2,633

    Default

    I think TS (thread starter) should actually try out shooting architecture first... Cos it seems to me like he hasn't tried it before and is just asking to get background info..
    My Flickr
    ~Neko baka

  19. #19

    Default

    Yes, i am wanting to try and askin for tips to do it.
    I am goin to save up and probly get the sigma 10-20mm.
    Thanks all for the advice..!

  20. #20

    Default Re: Architectural and Interior

    Quote Originally Posted by ravon11 View Post
    Thanks .. At 10mm,DX body, will there be too much distortion? Also, lets just say a general shot of few buildings, what kind of F stops are we looking at? I have a fellow photographer telling me not much diff in F11-F22 and beyond.. Not sure if he is correct?
    I personally tried F8-F11,16 etc.. like not much diff. (Bright daylight)..
    Care to elaborate why you mention flashes and off cam flash for architectural/ buildings..? Like flash painting?
    the reason for 1.5m off ground, is so that you can point the camera straight. It is just one the way to manage distortion. You might also shoot without going widest if it allow.

    "not much diff in F11-F22 and beyond" in a way he is correct. You probably should find out where is the aperture "sweet spot"(sharpest) of the lens. Another thing to take note is diffraction when shooting in very small aperture. Go find out at which aperture when diffraction will be observable. Whether shooting at f8 or f16 and you don't see much difference is probably because your subjects are quite faraway and you do not have a foreground. However, when you are shooting indoor, it is quite likely you have objects that might be quite close to the camera. You might get things at the furthest or nearest end, oof. There are dof calculator iphone apps that will allow you to find out at which aperture that will allow you to capture everything in focus.

    the flash are for interior shots. it is probably easier if you can google for interior photography lighting as they are able to explain better. Generally, what you will be trying to achieve is a properly lighted room with accurate color rendition(or either warm or cold color), contrasty but no harsh shadow. And especially when you try to capture a shot of the interior with windows showing how the outside looks like.

    Alternatively, You can do interior without any flashes provided it is well lighted and with a good sturdy tripod for a longer exposure.
    Coolthought - 冷静思考 - クールだ http://xaa.xanga.com/0aba0666d143253.../t35917343.gif

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •