Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 29

Thread: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

  1. #1

    Default Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    Decided to try out aperture priority mode after shooting Auto for a few days. On a D5100 with 18-55 kit lens. Tried taking stuff in my room on 18mm with f/8 and f/22. The shutter time is really long, 3-4 secs and it results in really out of focus pictures. ISO is at 100. However, taking a landscape picture at 18mm and f/22, the shutter is almost instant and produces pretty clear images. I am sure I am missing out on some settings that I need to adjust but I cant figure out which it is.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    Quote Originally Posted by SacredSoul View Post
    Decided to try out aperture priority mode after shooting Auto for a few days. On a D5100 with 18-55 kit lens. Tried taking stuff in my room on 18mm with f/8 and f/22. The shutter time is really long, 3-4 secs and it results in really out of focus pictures. ISO is at 100. However, taking a landscape picture at 18mm and f/22, the shutter is almost instant and produces pretty clear images. I am sure I am missing out on some settings that I need to adjust but I cant figure out which it is.
    Could it be ur room is slightly darker??

  3. #3

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    For picture taken in your room, "out of focus " pictures may be from the hand shake arising from long shutter speed. Try repeating same test using a tripod or place camera on table surface, instead of hand holding, when taking pictures inside the room. This is evident from your second information which says "shutter is almost instant and produces pretty clear images".

  4. #4
    Senior Member oracle0711's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Settling down in Punggol
    Posts
    2,133

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    TS, you are missing out a lot of things... tell you want, set your ISO to 800 and above, and set your aperture to the widest that you lens can offer -say 3.5 and see if you can make out what you have been missing. And before I forget to say, check your shutter speed to note the difference.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    Shutter speed at 3-4 secs handheld will of course result in blur shots

    The lighting conditions of any situation will determine how fast your shutter speed can be at a given aperture at a certain ISO. I'm certain your room's lighting is very different from the lighting where you shot your landscape shots.

    Learn how to balance the shutter speed (that you can safely handhold your camera at) with the aperture and ISO and you should see the difference.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    Thanks for all the replies! Yes, with the higher ISO setting, shutter speed is alot quick producing clear images. One more question, for landscape shots, with high f-stop values, images turn out to be dark. Higher ISO values will fix this I presume?

  7. #7

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    Quote Originally Posted by SacredSoul View Post
    Thanks for all the replies! Yes, with the higher ISO setting, shutter speed is alot quick producing clear images. One more question, for landscape shots, with high f-stop values, images turn out to be dark. Higher ISO values will fix this I presume?
    For landscape shots, try to keep your aperture within f/8 and below. Regarding ISO, try to keep to 800 and below and you should be fine.
    Flickr
    Canon 500D | 18-55mm IS | 50mm f/1.8 II

  8. #8

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    Quote Originally Posted by Linerax View Post
    For landscape shots, try to keep your aperture within f/8 and below. Regarding ISO, try to keep to 800 and below and you should be fine.
    Shouldn't I use a higher value like f/22 for landscape shots?

  9. #9

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    some says F/22 is not ideal for their lens, they says f/16 produce a better image.
    its boils down to which F/number produce the less " diffraction"( typo maybe)

  10. #10

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    Quote Originally Posted by SacredSoul View Post
    Shouldn't I use a higher value like f/22 for landscape shots?
    What aperture should I use?
    2) In general I always use F8 for my aperture on landscape shots, however I would be comfortable using F11 but have never felt the need to go that high. F8 extracts all of the detail that I need from my image, without causing any diffraction. Diffraction is as stated earlier, a softening of your image due to bends in the light rays hitting your sensor pixels. It can not be avoided, and the narrower the aperture, the greater your diffraction will be. Often times, beginner photographers do not realize how much Depth of Field is provided at lower apertures such as F8. They are more than adequate, and will help you achieve your best results.
    Basically, attempting to squeeze an equal amount of light via a smaller hole will cause the light rays to diffract, causing images to be less sharp compared to a bigger hole (smaller aperture) where light rays diffract less.

    Here's a link for you to read: Diffraction: When Smaller Apertures No Longer Mean Sharper Pictures - Photo Tips @ Earthbound Light



    Look at the sharpness between the f/8 and f/22 comparison.

    Hope this helps.
    Flickr
    Canon 500D | 18-55mm IS | 50mm f/1.8 II

  11. #11

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times


  12. #12

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    Quote Originally Posted by noraa80 View Post
    some says F/22 is not ideal for their lens, they says f/16 produce a better image.
    its boils down to which F/number produce the less " diffraction"( typo maybe)
    Ah right thanks. So a f/8 should be enough for street photography?

  13. #13

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    Quote Originally Posted by noraa80 View Post
    some says F/22 is not ideal for their lens, they says f/16 produce a better image.
    its boils down to which F/number produce the less " diffraction"( typo maybe)
    Thank you. It has helped loads. Thanks again!

  14. #14

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    For street photography, different people have different preferences, some prefer using apertures from f/5.6 ~ f/8 so everything they want is sharp.

    For others, they would rather use apertures like f/2 ~ f/3.5 in order to isolate their subjects from the background.

    It's all about personal preference. But using larger (or smaller, if you will.) apertures like f/2 ~ f/3.5 will allow you to have a faster shutter speed, which will be helpful in most cases.
    Flickr
    Canon 500D | 18-55mm IS | 50mm f/1.8 II

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Jurong
    Posts
    524

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    f8/9 - should be about the max you go.
    f11/12 - die die upper limit
    above that - accelerating degrading

    with your short FL, there is no need,... f5.6 is more than enough to get everything in focus....with a little attention

    the f/22 recommendations is from those books referencing from film days (or lower pixel density fx), which were not updated!

  16. #16

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    Thanks again for the replies. Have a much better understanding of aperture/shutter speed and ISO now. Thanks again!

  17. #17
    Member Csboi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Pulau Ubin
    Posts
    989

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    Play around with your settings and things will be clearer rather than reading from sources. Put them into practise and you will get more out of your camera. Hehehe we should shoot together. if you don't mind me as newbie. Hahaha have fun shooting
    Cheap lenses are not good AND Good lenses are not cheap!

  18. #18

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    Quote Originally Posted by Csboi View Post
    Play around with your settings and things will be clearer rather than reading from sources. Put them into practise and you will get more out of your camera. Hehehe we should shoot together. if you don't mind me as newbie. Hahaha have fun shooting
    I got my first dslr 5 days ago. Think I more of a noob lol. And sure, we can shoot together!

  19. #19
    Moderator rhino123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    NA
    Posts
    5,247

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    Read through some of the comments in this thread... and had to input this...

    It is NOT correct to say that for landscape it would be better to stay at f8 and below... and although there are lots of theory behind the light deffraction and stuff like that. But one had to take into consideration of many things before applying that theory... and it all boils down also to individual's lenses and camera... next... do not forget the DOF... if a lens was to use a big aperture and the DOF is too thin, parts of your landscape will not be sharp or at least in focus.

    So many of the landscape photographer actually use an aperture smaller than f8.
    I am not a photographer, just someone who happened to have a couple of cameras.
    My lousy shots

  20. #20
    Moderator daredevil123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    lil red dot
    Posts
    21,627
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Aperture Priority mode and extremely long shutter times

    Quote Originally Posted by swhyge View Post
    f8/9 - should be about the max you go.
    f11/12 - die die upper limit
    above that - accelerating degrading

    with your short FL, there is no need,... f5.6 is more than enough to get everything in focus....with a little attention

    the f/22 recommendations is from those books referencing from film days (or lower pixel density fx), which were not updated!
    It really depends on a lot of factors.

    Actually diffraction limit can be calculated... see here: Diffraction Limited Photography: Pixel Size, Aperture and Airy Disks

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •