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Thread: How to eliminate vibrations?

  1. #1
    Phildate
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    Default How to eliminate vibrations?

    I was shooting on the Benjamin Shears Bridge the other day but pics aren't totally sharp due to the vibrations from the traffic. I'm using a Gitzo tripod (not sure of model number but a medium-sized one).

    Can anyone advise on a way of eliminating the vibrations? Hanging camera-bag? Spikes (like on my hifi stand)? Anything else?

    Successful hints and tips much appreciated!!

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    Use a black cloth/card, cover the len when the bridge is vibrating, resume after the vibration has stopped, bulb exposure in this case is recommended.

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    I din't feel that the cars moving by posed much of a prob for me. only the occasional ground-moving ("up-down-up-down") when a heavy vehicle (bus, lorry, etc) goes by really affect my pics.

    I don't have any special technique except to wait for the big veh to be gone or lessen before snapping away. Maybe can get a VR/IS lens?
    “How fortunate for leaders that men do not think.” - Adolf Hitler

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    VR/IS won't help, the mechanism stabilizes any shake before the shutter is opened, not after.

  5. #5
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    ESPN, I like the black card idea. Will try next time. Thanks

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    espn :
    care to explain the theory behind the black card covering the lens?

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    Hi wainism,

    when the shutter is pointing at the subject, it catches the light reflected from it to the CCD/CMOS. Once a black card is placed over the len, all it catches are dark light (bad english here), and we all know dark light (bad english here again) doesn't affect images, cos there's no light (laggi bad english).

    Once the vibrations are over, remove the black card, the CCD/CMOS continous to catch the exposure on top of the already opened shutter for continous capture of light.

    This idea was given to me by djChris when I last went shooting with him during year 2003 NDP. He used the black card to cover the len, open the shutter then remove the card, this way the mirror shake is avoided. Similarly when closing back the shutter, use the black card to cover first, so that when the shutter/mirror is back in position, any shake is not affected.

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    Quote Originally Posted by espn
    Hi wainism,

    when the shutter is pointing at the subject, it catches the light reflected from it to the CCD/CMOS. Once a black card is placed over the len, all it catches are dark light (bad english here), and we all know dark light (bad english here again) doesn't affect images, cos there's no light (laggi bad english).

    Once the vibrations are over, remove the black card, the CCD/CMOS continous to catch the exposure on top of the already opened shutter for continous capture of light.

    This idea was given to me by djChris when I last went shooting with him during year 2003 NDP. He used the black card to cover the len, open the shutter then remove the card, this way the mirror shake is avoided. Similarly when closing back the shutter, use the black card to cover first, so that when the shutter/mirror is back in position, any shake is not affected.
    Expert talking! 3 cheers for a Expert!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by espn
    Hi wainism,

    when the shutter is pointing at the subject, it catches the light reflected from it to the CCD/CMOS. Once a black card is placed over the len, all it catches are dark light (bad english here), and we all know dark light (bad english here again) doesn't affect images, cos there's no light (laggi bad english).

    Once the vibrations are over, remove the black card, the CCD/CMOS continous to catch the exposure on top of the already opened shutter for continous capture of light.

    This idea was given to me by djChris when I last went shooting with him during year 2003 NDP. He used the black card to cover the len, open the shutter then remove the card, this way the mirror shake is avoided. Similarly when closing back the shutter, use the black card to cover first, so that when the shutter/mirror is back in position, any shake is not affected.
    wah seh, very cheem...
    heh heh, perhaps i too green liao, have never really gone to analyse how the censors work and stuff! thanks espn *kowtows*

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by wainism
    wah seh, very cheem...
    heh heh, perhaps i too green liao, have never really gone to analyse how the censors work and stuff! thanks espn *kowtows*
    the censors usually go *snip* *snip*

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    Quote Originally Posted by espn
    when the shutter is pointing at the subject, it catches the light reflected from it to the CCD/CMOS. Once a black card is placed over the len, all it catches are dark light (bad english here), and we all know dark light (bad english here again) doesn't affect images, cos there's no light (laggi bad english).

    hahah your malay just as bad..
    the quality of the black card/cloth matters as well..
    Got to make sure it isn't relective as much as possible and as BLACK as possible. I ever tried it in the past for fun and got some funny effects as if I got a super dirty dusty lens.

    Also, watch out for the finger holding the card.. heheh.. you wun want a finger vignett

    (just goes to show my lousy skills)
    “How fortunate for leaders that men do not think.” - Adolf Hitler

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    Quote Originally Posted by wainism
    wah seh, very cheem...
    heh heh, perhaps i too green liao, have never really gone to analyse how the censors work and stuff! thanks espn *kowtows*
    Think of film, CCD is just a substitute for film. The light hits the film, the film's chemicals react to the light and changes properties. When no light (dark light) hits the film, nothing will happen as light is the catalyst to get the chemicals to react. Once the light is resumed, the film will continue to react as the light hits it.

    Same goes for CCD.

    Sorry if I made it sound too complicated, me just a newbie at such stuff.

  13. #13
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    If I did not remember wrongly, the newer series of Lumix camera from Panasonic with mode 2 starts the IS while the shutter is opened, thus, the shake can be reduced by alot.

  14. #14

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    I like the idea suggested by ESPN. Informative read, thanks guys!

  15. #15

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    Hmm...I would think the IS/VR mechanism works throughout the exposure... No point having IS/VR just to have a stable viewfinder and not a stable exposure?

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    For me what is important is a good solid tripod, small f stop and looooong exposure.
    Chose a time when the traffic is either slow moving ( traffic jam so less movement as vehs moving slowly ) or less triffic. Use long exposure like maybe 1min and above ( if I remember correctly I use 1 1/2 min and above at f22 ), when a big veh ( bus, lorry etc ) go pass, the ground will shake for 1 or 2 sec. This short duration will not have much effect on the final outcome as the duration is too short to register due to small f stop. The problum comes in only when the ground shake cause the tripod to shift at the base ( either tripod too light or tridop legs is on spikes ) or too many heavy veh passing during the 1min or so ( like every 5 to 10 secs ) .
    I've done it before for a job using both a Mamiya 67 proSD( mid format ) w/ 50mm lens and on a Nikon 801s with a 28-85mm lens. Both turn out great. Both were shot using Manfottro 058b tripods ( studio tripod ) side by side. Remember to use the rubber and not the spike at the end of your tripod legs. If you don't have a heavy tripod, try adding weights like your camera bag to the tripod to help hold it down. Oh yeah......... camera bag must not be empty OK
    Hope this helps.

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