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Thread: Cold Temperature and ISO Noise

  1. #1
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    Default Cold Temperature and ISO Noise

    Was just wondering, does cold temperature (as in winter, around zero range) helps in lowering iso noise significantly to be noticeable?.. I have not try check it yet... anyone tested?

  2. #2

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    No. No need to try. Do you know wat is ISO? no directly link to temp
    Last edited by small pig; 22nd November 2011 at 01:29 PM.
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    Moderator rhino123's Avatar
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    Default Re: Cold Temperature and ISO Noise

    Theoretically, temperature would affect the amount of noise produce by an image sensor. Thus, it is possible to produce cleaner image in winter then in summer. However to quantify this (what is the ambience temperature to optimise this effect and stuff) I am not sure.
    I am not a photographer, just someone who happened to have a couple of cameras.
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  4. #4

    Default Re: Cold Temperature and ISO Noise

    It's usually not applicable to ISO noise, but rather the noise created from the sensor getting hot from long exposures (where the sensor gets hot). High-end astrophotographers use cameras with cooled sensors, but this is faaaaaar colder than you should ever encounter in winter, and is for long exposures, not the "normal" ISO noise.
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  5. #5

    Default Re: Cold Temperature and ISO Noise

    Most would worry more about their gear and batteries.. not sure about the noise..good or bad..you still have to shoot isnt it.
    Interesting topic though..camping here : X

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    Default Re: Cold Temperature and ISO Noise

    Quote Originally Posted by small pig View Post
    No. No need to try. Do you know Wat is ISO
    I bet you do not know!!!!

    Please look at the mirror before shooting!!!

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    Default Re: Cold Temperature and ISO Noise

    Quote Originally Posted by Rashkae View Post
    It's usually not applicable to ISO noise, but rather the noise created from the sensor getting hot from long exposures (where the sensor gets hot). High-end astrophotographers use cameras with cooled sensors, but this is faaaaaar colder than you should ever encounter in winter, and is for long exposures, not the "normal" ISO noise.

    I used one before many years ago!... though not successfully, but it was not due to my telescope mount and technique then....

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    Moderator rhino123's Avatar
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    Default Re: Cold Temperature and ISO Noise

    Quote Originally Posted by Rashkae View Post
    It's usually not applicable to ISO noise, but rather the noise created from the sensor getting hot from long exposures (where the sensor gets hot). High-end astrophotographers use cameras with cooled sensors, but this is faaaaaar colder than you should ever encounter in winter, and is for long exposures, not the "normal" ISO noise.
    I agreed that temperature only affect noise created by the sensor getting hot. However by pumping up ISO, it increase the sensitivitu of the sensor and during long exposure, more heat will be subjected to the sensor. Thus by lowering the temperature of the sensor, it will help in reducing noise.

    ISO and White Balance, digital cameras, digital photography, photography, digital slr, camera recommendation, price comparison, photographic companies, camera companies, digital camera best prices,

    In practice, you need to balance shooting convenience against potential for noise when adjusting ISO settings. Choose a low ISO for the majority of shots - including long exposures. But be prepared to increase the camera's sensitivity when conditions demand it, taking into account the potential for noise in the resulting shot.
    Be conscious of the effect temperature can have on image noise at ISO settings of 800 and above and be cautious about using the top ISO values when the temperature is above about 15 degrees Celsius. Noise can become particularly obvious when high ISO settings are combined with long exposures at temperatures of 20 degrees Celsius and above.
    I am not a photographer, just someone who happened to have a couple of cameras.
    My lousy shots

  9. #9

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    The sensitivity of the sensor does not change with camera settings. It is what it is per the design.

    The designers and microelectronics people have been trying to keep semiconductor noise to zero. There are many factors, temperature is a big culprit. Note that noise signals are not constant, it's random in both the strength and quantity.

    What changes with ISO is the threshold of the sensor output processing circuits. For low ISO, it sets the threshold at higher values, means light signals below a certain level are ignored and hopefully noise signals which are usually low gets cutoff as well.

    Once you get into high ISO settings, the threshold get lowered and stronger noise signal sneaks through and shows up. You'll never escape noise. A good sensor is one that generates minimal noise and give high signal outputs for light that falls on it to that noise can be controlled.

    A more sensitive sensor does not have better 'noise control' Its the stronger the signal strength that allows you to set higher thresholds (lower ISO) to capture the photo while ignoring the noise signals.

    An analogy is oil floating on water. The oil is your signal, water is noise. Noise is a thin later of water, If the layer of oil is thick, you can cutoff the layer of water with some oil and still have a good layer of oil(picture) Sacrificing more oil also allows stronger noise signals to be cutoff giving a cleaner picture. If the oil is thin (signal), losing some of the thin layer leaves little, you'll have to work at the separation layer and noise.

    That is also why fast lenses are better, with the larger lens, more light falls on the sensor and generates a stronger signal, allowing noise to be cutoff with minimal effect on the picture signal.

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