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Thread: Grand Opening Photo Competition

  1. #21
    Senior Member sinned79's Avatar
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    Default Re: Grand Opening Photo Competition

    Quote Originally Posted by coolthought View Post
    ps. if you haven't heard this before, in a recent open judging that I have attended, one of the judges (and agree by others as well) commented he is getting "tired" of seeing fisheye photos....
    then these judges should start by throwing aside all fisheye photos good or bad to make their point. no point talking but no action to reflect what they are thinking.

    not only judges are sick and tired of seeing fisheye photos, participants and viewers (myself) are feeling the same as well. Not one competition but almost all competition have at least one fisheye photo selected for the competition.

    that's why i said boring. Nothing against the first winner, but the rest (especially the second winner, i feel that a non fisheye shoot works better - at least no horrible distortion to those human subjects) ? more then half are fisheye shooters, some obviously cannot make it but dunno why the judge picked them, probably the judges themselves aren't photographers and are wow by these "amazing" distortion which normal shots cannot do.
    Last edited by sinned79; 27th December 2011 at 02:04 PM.

  2. #22

    Default Re: Grand Opening Photo Competition

    Quote Originally Posted by coolthought View Post
    Have you seen the winner of this competition? You think that this is a winner because it is lucky and because of his lens as well?
    I have seen the winner and i am not referring to his work. I was just making a very general statement that people tend to submit photos taken using fisheye for some reason, they tend to win as weel, though there maybe others that might be better in terms of creativity and composition etc.

    Since you mentioned, i have to agree that the winner produced quite a good piece of work but personally, for me, the consolation prize 2 was better than the 2nd and 3rd prize (choice of lens beside the point here)..
    Alpha
    Want to get back to photography

  3. #23

    Default Re: Grand Opening Photo Competition

    this blog post by a great photographer, Cole Thompson may help:

    source: Photoblog of Photographer Cole Thompson

    Another Rejection

    Receiving another rejection notice can be discouraging at best, and at worst can cause you to lose faith in your abilities and cause creative paralysis.

    I have submitted my work to hundreds of shows, exhibitions and magazines; and while I have gotten in some, I have also received many rejections. What is one to make of a rejection? Does it mean your work is not good enough or are there other reasons why it might have been rejected?

    To put a rejection into perspective I first ask myself “why did I submit to this event?” Understanding your motives can be useful in understanding your reactions. For example there was a time when I submitted my work to receive validation, to have someone say “your work is good.” And of course when my work was not accepted I interpreted this to mean that my work was not good and perhaps I was not a good photographer.

    But over time I have come to understand that my opinion of my work should be based on what I think of it and not what others think, and certainly not if it gets accepted into exhibitions! One of my favorite quotes is: “What others think of you is none of your business” and likewise what others think of my art is none of my business; my opinion is the only one that matters. That is not to say that I do not enjoy exhibiting or receiving compliments about my art, but there is a difference between enjoying compliments and needing them to feel good about oneself and ones art.

    So back to the rejection letter and what it might mean. The first possibility that I had to face was that my work was not good enough. It is very difficult to objectively evaluate your own work and even harder still to admit that it may not be good enough, but we must do that if we are going to improve. Rejection can be a good thing if it leads to change and improvement.

    But from my experience, a rejection can often mean something else much more innocent. Juror’s like anyone else have their own tastes, likes and dislikes. They tend to choose images that they personally like and that’s not a statement about your work. To increase the odds of my work being accepted I would research the juror’s own work and exhibitions they had juried to see what type of images they liked. If my images were in stark contrast to their preferences, I would skip that submission.

    For example I used to regularly submit to Shots Magazine even though their selections were “younger” and more “hip” than my work. I never got in and that bothered me so much that I irrationally set a goal of submitting until I got in, which I never did. It took a while before I realized that this was simply not the right venue for my work and it was not a reflection on the quality of my work. It simply wasn’t a good fit.

    Another selection factor is how your image fits in with the other images in the exhibition. A juror doesn’t just choose the “best” images but actually creates a new body of work by combining the individual images into a purposeful and intentional grouping. Sometimes images are chosen because they tie in with other of the juror’s selections, which is again not a reflection on the quality of your work.

    And then there is the “different” factor. I’ve had jurors tell me that they see so many images that they end up looking for ones that are simply different. If “different” is not your style and you’re more of a traditional photographer, your work may not be selected by that juror.




    There are so many reasons why an image may not be selected and so many of them have nothing at all to do with the quality of your work. That is why it’s so important that you believe in your work and continue to improve and persevere. Everyone has rejections and the people who win in the end, are the ones who do not give up.


    Strategies for Improving the Odds:

    Over time I devised a strategy that allowed me to improve my odds of getting my work selected, here is what I did:


    1. You must have good work, and “good” is more about the composition and feeling your image evokes rather than its technical quality. From my experience a juror will almost always pick an emotional image with poor technical quality over a technically perfect image that has no feeling or soul.


    2. Research the juror and their personal tastes. Does your work fit in? Can you select images for submission that seems to be more in keeping with their preferences? Are there jurors that have similar tastes as you, if so submit to shows that they are jurying.


    3. Focus on the smaller exhibitions that are likely to have fewer submissions and less on the really big exhibitions. I’d rather submit five images to a show with 500 submissions than submit five to a show with 5,000. Also look for shows that extend their deadlines, that often means they have received fewer entries than they expected. Let the numbers work in your favor.

    4. Submit as many images as you can afford. Submitting five images versus one dramatically increases your odds. Look for shows that are offering discounts, this will allow you to enter more images and improve your odds even more.

    5. Submit a variety of styles. I often would see someone submit five images and they were all virtually identical in subject and style. I would submit five very different images, figuring that if the juror didn’t like one then another might appeal to them. This is one of the best strategies I pursued to increase my odds.

    6. Select images that you love and have a passion for. In the beginning I would survey friends and family to try to pick images that had the widest appeal. That approach never improved my odds and it left me feeling conflicted and uncertain. You should pick images that you’re passionate about and forget what others think. I do not know how it works, but your passion does make a difference and improves your chances of getting accepted.


    By using these techniques I was able to achieve a 50% success rate; meaning that for every two submissions I’d get into one. Some of that was accomplished by improving my art and some of it by using these techniques. Use both to improve your odds.


    Rejection is a part of the artist’s life and while you can never remove it, you can reduce it. And more importantly you can better deal with rejection when you believe in your art and understand that the rejection was just another person’s opinion.


    In the end, you must be pleased with your work regardless of what others think.

    Cole

  4. #24
    Senior Member edutilos-'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Grand Opening Photo Competition

    Between you and me, I'm a little tired of seeing people complaining about competition winners, esp when it's taken with a fisheye.

    The solution is simple, actually, for me...

    1. Fisheye can win, buy fisheye. If buy already still cannot win, then I don't know, sell fisheye?
    2. If you think a photo competition is not worth your time, don't take part. Judges' decision is final, yes there are competitions which obviously are not designed with pleasing the photographic community in mind. That's life. Kthxbai.

  5. #25

    Default Re: Grand Opening Photo Competition

    Photography is ART, and not factual science. A photograph maybe nice to someone but may be shiit to others, just like how i always say that ansel adams photos are crap in my eyes.

    Dun be so sore, just move on.

    What is important is this world is the taste of ur customers, ur clients, ur panel of judges and NOT so much about ur own perception.

    I dun whine when my photos dun sell or dun win any prizes, but I know I just have to keep on observing and learning, and make myself better, so as to produce shots that will really sell and win stuffs.

  6. #26
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    Default Re: Grand Opening Photo Competition

    Quote Originally Posted by devilry View Post
    Photography is ART, and not factual science. A photograph maybe nice to someone but may be shiit to others, just like how i always say that ansel adams photos are crap in my eyes.

    Dun be so sore, just move on.

    What is important is this world is the taste of ur customers, ur clients, ur panel of judges and NOT so much about ur own perception.

    I dun whine when my photos dun sell or dun win any prizes, but I know I just have to keep on observing and learning, and make myself better, so as to produce shots that will really sell and win stuffs.
    This the first time I hear of anyone saying Ansel adam is crap........hmmmm......learn new things everyday........you must post more your pictures for us to see.....most of your previous posts have broken links to your images...except for the zoo one.....erm...
    Last edited by Danntbt; 27th December 2011 at 10:47 PM.

  7. #27
    Deregistered allenleonhart's Avatar
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    Default Re: Grand Opening Photo Competition

    Quote Originally Posted by Danntbt View Post
    This the first time I hear of anyone saying Ansel adam is crap........hmmmm......learn new things everyday........
    i know another. his name is joe mcnally.

    well. its just an opinion. who cares

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Grand Opening Photo Competition

    ..haha thanks for enlightening.........anyway I dun think most who commented took part in the competition, so its not like they are sore or anything....just voicing their opinion....

    ....but hey, devilry is saying that Photography is an Art and is not an exact Science, where opinion differs, and in the same breath saying it is important to pander to the taste of client, judges, customer......hahaha....Doesn't that sounds more like commercialism? Just give what the client wants....forget about creativity, artistry........if Fisheye wins competition, go buy one-lah.,,,so is photography Art in this sense?

    .....I think the points to note from this thread is that true, judges decisions are final, .....and true we need to think in the judges shoes in each competition, normally one can see the reasons for their decisions.......normally, not always....true at time its more like a lucky draw...true we should move on....hahaha, till we discuss the next competition....I guess its a way of learning...
    Last edited by Danntbt; 27th December 2011 at 11:33 PM.

  9. #29

    Default Re: Grand Opening Photo Competition

    Quote Originally Posted by Danntbt View Post
    ....but hey, devilry is saying that Photography is an Art and is not an exact Science, where opinion differs, and in the same breath saying it is important to pander to the taste of client, judges, customer......hahaha....Doesn't that sounds more like commercialism? Just give what the client wants....forget about creativity, artistry........if Fisheye wins competition, go buy one-lah.,,,so is photography Art in this sense?
    Thats the sad fact of life, the opinion of ur customers, the clients, and judges is all that matters, especially if u are a commercial shooter. In my beginning days when i first started out stock photography, I shot what I am interested in, and I uploaded all the best pictures of all I have, but they do not sell. In fact in the market if u look closely at the top grossing stock pictures, they could be just as simple as a banana on a white backdrop or an apple.

    This incident thought me tonnes about life in this commercial photography world. If u wanna feed ur belly, if u wanna win things, jolly well shoot what clients will pay for. Its perfectly fine to shoot wat u like, but if ur rice bowl is wat matters, give wat the world wants, not what u like.

    Reluctantly, i changed what I shot and uploaded whats the most popular stuff out there, and this is where the money starts rolling in.

    same thing here, its not stated that fisheye shots will win, and it might just be a coincidence that the winning shots are all shot on fisheye. It might also just so happen that the fisheye shots captured what the judges thought to be suitable for their theme.

    IF in any case it is still believed and thought that its because of the mere usage of fisheye that won it, then pls go and buy the fisheye, and compete in other competitions next time. there are many fisheye to choose from, if u are canon, go for the new 8-15L. if u are the rest, go get a fisheye prime. If u are sony nex, get the 16mm and attach a fisheye converter. If u are iphone, go search in clubsnap for a iphone attachement that shoots fisheye.

  10. #30
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    Default Re: Grand Opening Photo Competition

    ...in your case its no longer Art....in the true sense but more pure commercialism. I am not arguing that photography competition should or must
    focus on the Art type, different organizer have different agenda.....and different organizer have different type of judges...just that some of us do have
    question marks in our head......just as you had question marks when you started....these discussions just perhaps bring awareness that would let us make informed
    choices as to which type of competition we might want to participate in the future....many of us here probably do not rely on photography for a living so may not be
    so willing to compromise Art for Commercialism. Nobody is sore....just as you say Ansel is crap, some may feel the decision is crap....so be it....few of us probably would want to change our style to suit such decisions.....

  11. #31
    Deregistered allenleonhart's Avatar
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    Default Re: Grand Opening Photo Competition

    Quote Originally Posted by Danntbt View Post
    ...in your case its no longer Art....in the true sense but more pure commercialism. I am not arguing that photography competition should or must
    focus on the Art type, different organizer have different agenda.....and different organizer have different type of judges...just that some of us do have
    question marks in our head......just as you had question marks when you started....these discussions just perhaps bring awareness that would let us make informed
    choices as to which type of competition we might want to participate in the future....many of us here probably do not rely on photography for a living so may not be
    so willing to compromise Art for Commercialism. Nobody is sore....just as you say Ansel is crap, some may feel the decision is crap....so be it....few of us probably would want to change our style to suit such decisions.....

    aiya just don't join the competitions you don't like lor.
    i already boycotting a few liao. don't see the problem.

  12. #32

    Default Re: Grand Opening Photo Competition

    Ah yes, the classic commercialism of art dilemma. As an in-house graphic designer and photographer, I pretty much encounter this problem when it comes to creative perspectives. Sometimes I would do an artwork or shoot a photo but my boss would not like it and would ask me to change certain "elements" in the art. Then the final output becomes ugly in my eyes but pretty in theirs. I ask my self, why would they hire a "graphic designer" if they would still insists that their taste is better. I even ask fellow designers to compare and they would also like my original designs better but they would always advise me to just follow what the boss wants, cause the boss pays you to do your job. If you don't like the design, don't put it in your portfolio.

    I believe that only artists can really appreciate another artist's work. When you show an artwork to a typical laymen, as long as it looks good to that person, he will like it. He will not bother to see if you follow the rule of thirds, if the colors match, if it's saturated or whatever. Have you seen one of those old friendster page layouts? You can tell who's got creative and artistic skills from those who don't Even in post-processing photos, some would overdo a certain effect to the point that it becomes ugly and a sore to the eyes.

    With regards to the competition, better check who the judges first before joining. If judges are typical laymen or someone that doesn't really have any artistic inclination, don't bother joining unless you want to take a chance on losing to an ugly entry. If the judges are professional photographers, like those in the One Asia Challenge, then expect that they would have some creative expectations and would be critical in judging the entries. Maybe that's why they extended the One Asia Challenge. The entries did not meet the judges standards.

  13. #33
    Deregistered allenleonhart's Avatar
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    Default Re: Grand Opening Photo Competition

    Quote Originally Posted by skeeg View Post
    With regards to the competition, better check who the judges first before joining. If judges are typical laymen or someone that doesn't really have any artistic inclination, don't bother joining unless you want to take a chance on losing to an ugly entry. If the judges are professional photographers, like those in the One Asia Challenge, then expect that they would have some creative expectations and would be critical in judging the entries. Maybe that's why they extended the One Asia Challenge. The entries did not meet the judges standards.

    doesnt exactly matter. i've seen many judges from xxxPS (xxx standing their organisation), who are their advisor, their president etc etc.

    photos still look the same to me.

    which is why... i say its a lucky draw. heng suey.

  14. #34
    Senior Member sinned79's Avatar
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    Default Re: Grand Opening Photo Competition

    Quote Originally Posted by skeeg View Post
    Even in post-processing photos, some would overdo a certain effect to the point that it becomes ugly and a sore to the eyes.
    Good example here:
    http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/digit...ml#post7641044

    I find the thunder too fake.
    Last edited by sinned79; 28th December 2011 at 01:11 PM.

  15. #35
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    Default Re: Grand Opening Photo Competition

    Quote Originally Posted by sinned79 View Post
    Good example here:
    http://www.clubsnap.com/forums/digit...ml#post7641044

    I find the thunder too fake.

    ...well similar to those 'Art' pieces that people buy - Balinese, Chinese, Vietnamese from the streets ......

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