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Thread: sRGB or Adobe RGB?

  1. #1
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    Question sRGB or Adobe RGB?

    Hello,

    I'm using a Nikon D70 and I use mainly Adobe RGB as I understand that it can record a wider colour gamut range...

    My question is, I heard that photo developing machines work using sRGB. So would it be better if I switch my colour profile to SRGB instead of Adobe RGB?

    Regards.

  2. #2
    Senior Member sammy888's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raid
    Hello,

    I'm using a Nikon D70 and I use mainly Adobe RGB as I understand that it can record a wider colour gamut range...

    My question is, I heard that photo developing machines work using sRGB. So would it be better if I switch my colour profile to SRGB instead of Adobe RGB?

    Regards.

    Here's my two cents on this.....

    How competence are you with post production work? Shooting on Adobe RGB is the way to go if you want to retain as much details and information for each photography you take. But having said that you have to also take note or you might even have found that out already when you place picture shot in both format...that is...same shot but one in Adobe RGB and the other in sRGB I or II. Notice how much more richer and vivid the colours are most of the time for sRGB? Adobe RGB seem more muted. BUt that is because this mode capture as much details so that it allows for more dynamic colour and detail range to work with when you use graphic software like Photoshop to manipulate it later on the PC. The more details it keeps in each picture the more easier it is to sometime "save" shots that were not shot at the ideal exposure for example.



    But note...there is a misconception alot of people make and it is apparant in some other thread when they talk about shooting raw or jpeg and to adobe RGB or sRGB. If you make a mistake with your shot that borders on extreme like really blurry shot, under expose by 3 steps or more or over-exposure to the point you get white-out in all the highlights..then you will find your RAW Adobe is as good as destinct for deletion. Personally if I need to shoot very important stuff that need to be use for advertisement, really large enlargement or for graphic manipulation in a complex layout...I would not only shoot in RAW and in Adobe RGB I would be bracketing all my shots.

    Getting back to your situation, as I mentioned, what level of skill are you in the use of graphic software like photoshop in order to do your post production work. If you are only looking to get them develope at a digit printing kiosk, I would strongly advice you shoot in sRGB mode which is compatible with their machine calibrated in general for reading the colour space of the pictures you shot and will ensure it is more or less true to colour. sRGB is an ICM colour space by Microsoft to basic be in simple terms a calibration standard that if used and install over a given set of hardware from PC monitor to printing machine to whatever hardward for viewing or reproducing printing to ensure that what you see is what you get from the shot you took with your digital camera to your PC and out from your printer or a kiosk. The kiosk would still be able to open your file of course even if you present them with digital photo in adobe RGB..their machine's program will most likely convert them to working sRGB colour space. Problem is the staff might not colour correct for you and also how will the conversion from Adobe RGB to sRGB by the machine will result in the 'right' colour is subjective and you might not know till you see the prints.

    Gamut is something that is more sensitive and more a concern if you are talking about printing in four colour. It is refer to the dynamic range of colour tints. On your PC monitor you can see more colour range but when you are printing your photo on a pc printer..certain shades of the colour or POP colours are not present as it falls outside the gamut or colour capability of the printer's ink t reproduce it. And it gets even more limited when you consider folk like me who does advertisement design and print media work...four colour printing means the gamut gets limited even further...unless you consider spot colour..heheh okay that is abit too technical and even for a serious photographer.

    It is not exacting science but for those who are not into learning post production or for those just starting out in digital or buying a point and shoot camera this is the best alternative. There is nothing wrong if you dont want to dabble in graphic post production....if so...stick with sRGB for now and just shoot in JPEG High. you dont even really need to shoot RAW. All this extra large file is useless to you if the picture will never see any manipulation at all.

    Personally, 90% of the time when I shoot for my own pleasure, i shoot Hi-Jpeg on my D70 and I use sRGB I for general and if I want to shoot scene that has more greenery.I would change over to sRGB II which favour nature forest colours more. Then I would set to Auto White Balance with -1 to -2 setting or I would set to haze ( even for bright sunny days ) and set it again to -1 ot -2 setting.

    The good thing if you shoot even in sRGB mode..even if you get the colour temperature wrong or slight exposure issue a jpeg file can still be adjusted if you or a friend is handy with a graphic software like Photoshop, you can easily change it on your PC. But if you do get more serious about digital photography you will have to learn to use the software too and learn to teach your eyes how to read colours and adjust accordingly. And it goes without saying that in that case Adobe RGB would be the best choice too.

    Nothing is totally perfect bro...alot depends on what you are capable of presently in terms of ability and what you want to do with or without. But if you are still learning I would suggest you set it to sRGB mode for now which will improve the colours of your shots and please you with more better looking shots. Sometime you should not just rush into it or rush into too many things at one time. There are alot of things to learn in Photography..you have your whole life to do it if you really do love the hobby.

    Hope I managed to answer your question in some way. And maybe some other folks here could pitch in further the complete the picture.


    cheers
    Last edited by sammy888; 10th November 2004 at 03:13 PM.

  3. #3
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    Hi, can we tell the photo shops like Kodak to print with Adobe RGB colour profile? What about the popular KT (where is KT btw ?)?

  4. #4

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    When you shoot RAW, you do not shoot 'Adobe RGB' or 'sRGB'.

    Which is a good thing because 10D and 1Ds actual gamut exceeds that of Adobe RGB in most areas so if you really wanted to maximise colour information, you can assign the ProPhoto RGB colourspace to your RAW files.

    Also, RAW can be converted to 16-bit files, whereas JPG for DSLRs is currently 8-bit (though 16-bit jpg does exist)

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by erwinx
    When you shoot RAW, you do not shoot 'Adobe RGB' or 'sRGB'.

    Which is a good thing because 10D and 1Ds actual gamut exceeds that of Adobe RGB in most areas so if you really wanted to maximise colour information, you can assign the ProPhoto RGB colourspace to your RAW files.

    Also, RAW can be converted to 16-bit files, whereas JPG for DSLRs is currently 8-bit (though 16-bit jpg does exist)
    yo dude, i think the user has a D70 and in raw it's sRGB I, II(Adobe), III

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