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Thread: Handholding monster set-ups

  1. #1

    Default Handholding monster set-ups

    Recently I've seen some of Harlequin's birding shots and looking at the settings, I was quite shocked.
    600mm+1.4TC at 1/90s handheld. Shots were sharp to say the least. Was thinking and this set-up probably weighs at least 8 kilos with the body included.
    Was hoping some of the bird shooters who regularly pull off shots with such settings could share some of their techniques so users of smaller glass(like myself) can apply it to concert shooting and other low light situations.
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  2. #2
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    go lift weights regularly? buy IS/VR lens? strap camera to head & use neck support?
    Logging Off. "You have 2,631 messages stored, of a total 400 allowed." don't PM me.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stoned
    Recently I've seen some of Harlequin's birding shots and looking at the settings, I was quite shocked.
    600mm+1.4TC at 1/90s handheld. Shots were sharp to say the least. Was thinking and this set-up probably weighs at least 8 kilos with the body included.
    Was hoping some of the bird shooters who regularly pull off shots with such settings could share some of their techniques so users of smaller glass(like myself) can apply it to concert shooting and other low light situations.
    >8kg? Let me see...

    Body: 1.25kg
    600mm: 5.8kg
    TC-14EII: 0.2kg
    SB800: ~0.45kg (w/batts)

    Total weight is about 7.7kg, if no flash attached, it would be 7.25kg.

  4. #4

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    ok maybe i overestimated a little bit. Its still blardy heavy. Lift weights?
    Hmm do bird shooters look like Mr Universe then?
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  5. #5
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    I've seen Harlequin shoot birds and I don't think he shoots them handheld with that setup. He uses a huge Gitzo tripod with Wimberely Sidekick - super stable support. Unless he's been going to the gym recently.
    Last edited by gooseberry; 8th November 2004 at 10:20 AM.

  6. #6

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    http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?t=100000

    This is the one. Check out the settings at the top. Maybe he has been going to the gym (sorry harlequin for hijacking your post )
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    There are certain techniques and positions to adopt when "hand-holding" such heavy setup.

    Some gym sessions won't hurt either.

    Maybe bro Harle can shed some light.

  8. #8
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    The heaviest I've ever handheld is a D1H + 300 f/2.8... oh man already very heavy... no more ... NO MORE!!!

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    He is muscular and fit

  10. #10
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    tell that to a noob in photography... me...
    i cant seem to hold my camera firm enough ... yet... even though i can carry a lot in the gym

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stoned
    http://forums.clubsnap.org/showthread.php?t=100000

    This is the one. Check out the settings at the top. Maybe he has been going to the gym (sorry harlequin for hijacking your post )
    There are many ways of so call "handheld" method.

    You "handheld" the setup but with your hand supported on some railings, trees are also consider handheld right?

    It all depends on how you interpret the meaning

  12. #12

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    Hmm true... Still i can't imagine it being easy.
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  13. #13
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    Wow.. 7kg+.. after handhelding a 100-400 + 420ex flash for 2 hrs, my arms already shaky liao..
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by ccplim
    There are many ways of so call "handheld" method.

    You "handheld" the setup but with your hand supported on some railings, trees are also consider handheld right?

    It all depends on how you interpret the meaning
    Yup. Bracing yourself with the lens against a tree, wall or a car windowsill helps stabilise the lens quite a bit. If lack of support, try holding the lens with your supporting hand placed as far away from the body as possible, tuck in your elbow close to your body. Breathing technique also is important. Usually I fire a series of shots (abt 3-4) for insurance, normally the first shot is the one that is not sharp. Watch your shutter speed also, if its too low, say below 1/90 then its probable some shake might occur. Last of all, practice more!

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